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Blackout watch 2011


Island_Style

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Time to keep track of the blackouts this year. Cant imagine any in week one. Jags will be blackout free in week 1.

Living in Florida, how could you not know that the Lions-Bucs game, quite possibly THE game of the week, is gonna be blacked out?? BTW, this is the Bucs NINTH straight home game blackout.

All with a good, young team. Tampa should be the one to lose their team.

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I can't blame fans in Florida who don't want to shell out $200 to spend three hours sitting outside in absurdly hot temperatures to watch their teams, meanwhile having to deal with drunken louts waving their beer cups at anyone who dare wear anything that even closely resembles the opposing team's colors.

Often times you can get a game plan package for less than the cost of one set of family tickets to a game.

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I can't blame fans in Florida who don't want to shell out $200 to spend three hours sitting outside in absurdly hot temperatures to watch their teams, meanwhile having to deal with drunken louts waving their beer cups at anyone who dare wear anything that even closely resembles the opposing team's colors.

Often times you can get a game plan package for less than the cost of one set of family tickets to a game.

$200?

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I can't blame fans in Florida who don't want to shell out $200 to spend three hours sitting outside in absurdly hot temperatures to watch their teams, meanwhile having to deal with drunken louts waving their beer cups at anyone who dare wear anything that even closely resembles the opposing team's colors.

Often times you can get a game plan package for less than the cost of one set of family tickets to a game.

$200?

Yes, the most inexpensive Buccaneers tickets are $35 apiece plus fees translating to $44/each. An NFL game is not the most economical family outing.

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I can't blame fans in Florida who don't want to shell out $200 to spend three hours sitting outside in absurdly hot temperatures to watch their teams, meanwhile having to deal with drunken louts waving their beer cups at anyone who dare wear anything that even closely resembles the opposing team's colors.

Often times you can get a game plan package for less than the cost of one set of family tickets to a game.

$200?

Yes, the most inexpensive Buccaneers tickets are $35 apiece plus fees translating to $44/each. An NFL game is not the most economical family outing.

You realize that is less than half of most team's cheapest tickets, right?

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Last year, the Rams bought up their own unsold tickets to avoid blackouts. I don't expect them to have to do that this season.

This is true. I was also under the impression it wasn't that uncommon, though. If it's close to a sell out, the team, the local TV affiliate, and sometimes local businesses will chip in and buy up the rest. But I suppose I don't have much exposure to what happens in other markets.

Anyways, my hope is that you're right that they should be able to sell out their games this year. Of course, their first half schedule is rough, so if the start off like 3-5 (which is quite possible--and would still give them a good shot to go 9-7), I'm hoping fans won't think the year is a lost cause. On the other hand, if they could pull some early surprises like beating the Eagles (and I've seen a lot more analysts give them the nod than I'd have ever imagined), that would be a big boost.

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Last year, the Rams bought up their own unsold tickets to avoid blackouts. I don't expect them to have to do that this season.

This is true. I was also under the impression it wasn't that uncommon, though. If it's close to a sell out, the team, the local TV affiliate, and sometimes local businesses will chip in and buy up the rest. But I suppose I don't have much exposure to what happens in other markets.

Anyways, my hope is that you're right that they should be able to sell out their games this year. Of course, their first half schedule is rough, so if the start off like 3-5 (which is quite possible--and would still give them a good shot to go 9-7), I'm hoping fans won't think the year is a lost cause. On the other hand, if they could pull some early surprises like beating the Eagles (and I've seen a lot more analysts give them the nod than I'd have ever imagined), that would be a big boost.

I know it wasn't that uncommon back in the '80s and '90s - basically before the new-stadium boom and the general NFL explosion. I'm not sure how much of that goes on nowadays though - based on the amount of blackouts we hear about, doesn't seem like it's that common, but I really don't know.

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I know it wasn't that uncommon back in the '80s and '90s - basically before the new-stadium boom and the general NFL explosion. I'm not sure how much of that goes on nowadays though - based on the amount of blackouts we hear about, doesn't seem like it's that common, but I really don't know.

More teams then not sell out their games. 6 teams had games that were blacked out last year. (Bengals, Bills, Bucs, Chargers, Lions and Raiders)

Personally I think this rule needs to be done away with. The cost of going to game right now is simply insane. Ticket prices have pretty much doubled for every team going back ten years ago. No team should be having problems making money off gate receipts.

If your spending that kind of money on going to a game, your going whether its aired on TV or not. If your not going it means you either can't afford it, or you just don't want to go. I don't think there's that many people out there deciding that if the game isn't on TV, they're going to spend hundreds of dollars to go to the game instead.

Its just an antiquated theory that I think has been proven wrong for a long time now.

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The other problem with the rule is that generally speaking the teams that aren't selling out games are losing teams. Losing leads to apathy with in a fan base. That in turn leads to fans not spending money on tickets. But most of those fans will still watch the games on TV, remain interested in the team. But when those games aren't available on TV, a lot of fans "shut it down" if you will. Blacking out losing teams doesn't make fans want to buy tickets, it makes fans go away.

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There's no problem with the blackout rule as long as teams adjust their prices and supply accordingly--and this part here is key--over the offseason. You can't deep-discount your inventory after people have paid in full for season tickets lest you alienate them and lose a part of your base. Well, I mean, you can, but it can't be a wise move. Starting each ticket campaign with adjusted prices is fine, though, and I dare say necessary. With the televised NFL experience getting better and better, and nobody having much disposable income anymore, it's harder and harder to justify paying top dollar for an inferior experience. Considering all the money teams make on television deals and luxury boxes, with some teams profiting off their TV revenue sharing alone, they're better off selling upper deck seats for cheap than not selling them at all. Look at how Jacksonville pulled themselves out of the grave (for now). You think people are paying big bucks to see the Jaguars? I highly doubt it. They're making the right adjustments.

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