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Interesting Sports Facts and Statistics


fouhy12
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Apparently, first time ever tonight in baseball that the home teams were perfect.

It's actually just the first time that the home teams have gone 15 for 15, which is slightly less amazing when you realize that baseball has only had 30 teams since 1998.

Still would have figured it wouldn't taken this long for that quirk to happen.

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Apparently, first time ever tonight in baseball that the home teams were perfect.

It's actually just the first time that the home teams have gone 15 for 15, which is slightly less amazing when you realize that baseball has only had 30 teams since 1998.

Still would have figured it wouldn't taken this long for that quirk to happen.

According to ESPN, the odds of this happening on a given day (in which all 30 teams played) would be 1 in 32,000, assuming each game is a 50/50 proposition. Of course, the home team does have a slightly better chance to win, in general (not always, though. For example the Twins, definitely the worst team in MLB right now, were at home and have less than a 50% chance to win any game they play).

I am sure some SABRmetrician can probably figure out what the chance was that those 15 games would all be won by the home team.

I would say that if MLB stays with this number of teams and this basic schedule forever, this is probably less than a once per decade occurrence.

The question is, will we ever get all road teams to win? The article points out that road teams went undefeated at 7-0 a couple of years ago. Tacking 8 more games on that would certainly have ended the dream...

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During his career, Nolan Ryan recorded exactly 5,000 more strikeouts than Babe Ruth hit home runs (5,714 / 714).

The originally intended name for the Dallas Cowboys was the Texas Rangers.

The Chicago White Sox and San Francisco Giants each were tentatively sold to buyers who would have moved them to Tampa, but in each case MLB stepped in to prevent it.

At one point in the early history of the NBA, the city of Chicago (six - Cubs, White Sox, Bears, Cardinals, Black Hawks, Zephyrs) was home to more "big four" professional sports franchises than any other city, equalled only by New York (Dodgers, Giants, Yankees, Giants, Knickerbockers, Rangers).

Philadelphia is the only city (I think - I'm writing this at 5am while half-asleep so I could be wrong about this one) to have lost both professional baseball (A's) and basketball (Warriors) franchises, yet which has both professional baseball (Phillies) and basketball (76ers) franchises today.

By the time they had taken the court as an expansion team, the Miami Heat had already signed a player to a contract whose total value exceeded its expansion fee (Rony Seikaly - sp?)

New York metropolian area technicality has nine teams now (Yankees, Mets, Giants, Jets, Knicks, Nets, Rangers, Islanders, and Devils).

Thus the qualifier "At one point in the early history of the NBA..."

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The Chicago White Sox and San Francisco Giants each were tentatively sold to buyers who would have moved them to Tampa, but in each case MLB stepped in to prevent it.

That's not true relating to the White Sox. The current ownership group purchased the team from Bill Veeck in 1981, and they were threatening to move to Tampa before Illinois built them a new park. They never intended on selling.

An interesting fact - the city of Seattle sued the American League when it allowed to Pilots to leave after one season. The owner of the White Sox was broke and needed to sell the team in 1975. To settle the suit, the AL was pushing to sell the White Sox to Seattle ownership and let the team move. Denver ownership was among the bidders, I believe, but the only bidder willing to keep the team in Chicago was Bill Veeck, who had previously owned the team and sold is to the then-owners 13 years earlier. Despite most of the AL owners disliking Veeck, they approved the sale to allow the team to stay in Chicago. Seattle got the expansion Mariners two years later.

Maybe more interestingly, if the White Sox would have moved to Seattle, Charlie Finley was planning on moving the Athletics into Comiskey Park.

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The Chicago White Sox and San Francisco Giants each were tentatively sold to buyers who would have moved them to Tampa, but in each case MLB stepped in to prevent it.

That's not true relating to the White Sox. The current ownership group purchased the team from Bill Veeck in 1981, and they were threatening to move to Tampa before Illinois built them a new park. They never intended on selling.

An interesting fact - the city of Seattle sued the American League when it allowed to Pilots to leave after one season. The owner of the White Sox was broke and needed to sell the team in 1975. To settle the suit, the AL was pushing to sell the White Sox to Seattle ownership and let the team move. Denver ownership was among the bidders, I believe, but the only bidder willing to keep the team in Chicago was Bill Veeck, who had previously owned the team and sold is to the then-owners 13 years earlier. Despite most of the AL owners disliking Veeck, they approved the sale to allow the team to stay in Chicago. Seattle got the expansion Mariners two years later.

Maybe more interestingly, if the White Sox would have moved to Seattle, Charlie Finley was planning on moving the Athletics into Comiskey Park.

Indeed, I stand corrected about the 'Sox. I knew a move to Tampa was allegedly a done deal at one point, but thought it was tied to the Veeck-Reinsdorf sale. The latter story is one I've also heard, only in a more odd version in which the White Sox would've went to Seattle only to be replaced by Charlie Finley's Oakland A's, who would've went to Chicago. Another version I've heard would've had Bud Selig guaranteeing 30 of his 81 Milwaukee Brewers home dates to Chicago, and yet another would've had the San Francisco Giants play an equal number of dates in both San Francisco and Oakland as the "Bay Area Giants."

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During his career, Nolan Ryan recorded exactly 5,000 more strikeouts than Babe Ruth hit home runs (5,714 / 714).

The originally intended name for the Dallas Cowboys was the Texas Rangers.

The Chicago White Sox and San Francisco Giants each were tentatively sold to buyers who would have moved them to Tampa, but in each case MLB stepped in to prevent it.

At one point in the early history of the NBA, the city of Chicago (six - Cubs, White Sox, Bears, Cardinals, Black Hawks, Zephyrs) was home to more "big four" professional sports franchises than any other city, equalled only by New York (Dodgers, Giants, Yankees, Giants, Knickerbockers, Rangers).

Philadelphia is the only city (I think - I'm writing this at 5am while half-asleep so I could be wrong about this one) to have lost both professional baseball (A's) and basketball (Warriors) franchises, yet which has both professional baseball (Phillies) and basketball (76ers) franchises today.

By the time they had taken the court as an expansion team, the Miami Heat had already signed a player to a contract whose total value exceeded its expansion fee (Rony Seikaly - sp?)

New York metropolian area technicality has nine teams now (Yankees, Mets, Giants, Jets, Knicks, Nets, Rangers, Islanders, and Devils).

Both the As and Warriors are in Oakland after making stops in Kansas City and San Francisco.

The Warriors were never in KC that was the Kings who were the Cincinnati Royals.

No. What I meant was the As were in Kansas City and Warriors were in San Francisco.

As were Philadelphia (1901-1954), Kansas City (1955-1967), and Oakland (1968-present).

Warriors were Philadelphia (1946-1963), San Francisco (1963-1975), and Oakland (1975-present). You misunderstood me.

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  1. Tom Brady has played two games at University of Phoenix Stadium, but he has never played the Cardinals there. The Pats have played two Super Bowls there, but only played the Cardinals at home since the stadium was built.

Many teams have yet to play at University of Phoenix Stadium. This year will be the Bengals and Ravens first time visit. The Chargers last year had to visit the venue for the first time in the regular season.

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