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Help Bring Back The Jets


josh_cat_eyes

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As for owners who became wealthier, George Steinbrenner, Mark Cuban, Tom Hicks, and Malcom Glazer spring to mind immediately.

You really think that Cuban is wealthier now after buying the Mavericks than he was when he got $5.04B in stock from Yahoo! in return for selling Broadcast.com?

When I say that I mean that his personal fortune has increased since he took over the Mavericks. It's not noticeable in the grand scheme of things for him, but he did buy the Mavericks for $203 million in 2000, and they're now worth $463 million, up 14% from last year.

As for Melnyk, it was smart business sense for him in that since the Senators were just exiting bankruptcy, and as a result had a much smaller debt load (When they filed for bankruptcy, the debts for the team and the ScotiaBank Place was about 80%--now, it's down to 15%, and dropping) to deal with. The franchise and arena were valued by the bankruptcy court at around $300 million, with it now pushing $400 million after only 3 years.

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Being a card carrying lefty, I'm happy about the election results. I'm in favour of bringing NHL hockey back, but it shouldn't be at the expense of a myriad of more important issues. I think most Manitobans, regardless of political view, would agree with that.

The whole Jets thing was a bad move by the Tories, but they weren't going to win anyways. It was more of a desperation move than anything.

If NHL hockey is going to ever come back, it will be from the private sector.

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With no disrecpect to some of the best hockey fans in the world, as they showed it a t the WORLDS (Winnipegers and Manitobans...) I would like some rules in pro sportsd that say once you lose a franchise, you shouldn't get one back.

It's ridiculous to watch a Baltimore Indy in the NFL or a Wild-Stars game in the NHL...

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With no disrecpect to some of the best hockey fans in the world, as they showed it a t the WORLDS (Winnipegers and Manitobans...) I would like some rules in pro sportsd that say once you lose a franchise, you shouldn't get one back.

It's ridiculous to watch a Baltimore Indy in the NFL or a Wild-Stars game in the NHL...

By that logic there would be no NHL teams in Atlanta, Minnesota, Ottawa, Colorado, St. Louis, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and (sorta) San Jose.

And Major league baseball would probably be down to 15 teams.

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With no disrecpect to some of the best hockey fans in the world, as they showed it a t the WORLDS (Winnipegers and Manitobans...) I would like some rules in pro sportsd that say once you lose a franchise, you shouldn't get one back.

It's ridiculous to watch a Baltimore Indy in the NFL or a Wild-Stars game in the NHL...

So, if a jack@$$ owner decides to move a team, with or without justification, the old city would be forever banned from having a team in that league? Is that really what you think?

Imagine that. The Dallas Texans of the early 1950s failed, so say goodbye to the Dallas Cowboys. And think of all the angry would-be New England Patriots fans scarred by the move of the Boston Redskins. And no more Baltimore Orioles since the original American League team became the New York Yankees.

Hmm, sounds like a "What if . . . " thread.

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Looks like Gary Doer will remain as Premier of Manitoba. I guess the Jets will not return in 4 years :P

...and spirits across this message board are simultaneously crushed. :P

I'll tell you one thing, with a good chunk of the friends I graduated university with moving away upon graduating, Doer's message of "moving forward, not back" rang kind of hollow.

Give me a bold, if not sometimes reckless, visionary over a pedestrian space-filler anyday. :)

...and if the city and province would clearly benefit from the presence of the NHL in our city (the name recognition alone would be worth millions), why shouldn't they contribute to bringing them here?

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As someone who's never set foot in the province, why is everyone hellbent on leaving Manitoba?

Alberta and, to a lesser extent, Saskatchewan have oil. That alone has created economic booms in those provinces (despite them being veritable wastelands compared to the beauty that is Manitoba :)).

Don't get me wrong; most of the graduates find good jobs no problem here - I have, as did most who tried - it's just Manitoba is not doing everything it could to keep itself competitive in the face of the job creation that comes with the black gold further west.

Ultimately, I have confidence in the renewability of Manitoba's resources (primarily hydro-electric power), and Winnipeg as a city is indeed moving forward (not as quickly as others, but progressing), but it is still frustrating to see a significant portion move away.

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As someone who's never set foot in the province, why is everyone hellbent on leaving Manitoba?

Alberta and, to a lesser extent, Saskatchewan have oil. That alone has created economic booms in those provinces (despite them being veritable wastelands compared to the beauty that is Manitoba :)).

Don't get me wrong; most of the graduates find good jobs no problem here - I have, as did most who tried - it's just Manitoba is not doing everything it could to keep itself competitive in the face of the job creation that comes with the black gold further west.

Ultimately, I have confidence in the renewability of Manitoba's resources (primarily hydro-electric power), and Winnipeg as a city is indeed moving forward (not as quickly as others, but progressing), but it is still frustrating to see a significant portion move away.

Thanks. I was under the impression that Manitoba also benefitted from the oil largesse out in that area of Canada.

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As someone who's never set foot in the province, why is everyone hellbent on leaving Manitoba?

Alberta and, to a lesser extent, Saskatchewan have oil. That alone has created economic booms in those provinces (despite them being veritable wastelands compared to the beauty that is Manitoba :)).

Don't get me wrong; most of the graduates find good jobs no problem here - I have, as did most who tried - it's just Manitoba is not doing everything it could to keep itself competitive in the face of the job creation that comes with the black gold further west.

Ultimately, I have confidence in the renewability of Manitoba's resources (primarily hydro-electric power), and Winnipeg as a city is indeed moving forward (not as quickly as others, but progressing), but it is still frustrating to see a significant portion move away.

Thanks. I was under the impression that Manitoba also benefitted from the oil largesse out in that area of Canada.

Some of us move to BC just to get away from the -40c winters, but that's just me.

Manitoba could have been self-sufficient decades ago, had they worked the sales of hydroelectricity to other jurisdictions in similar ways to how Alberta sells oil; had they done that back in the 60's (I believe former mayor Steve Juba tried, and failed), among other things, the face of Winnipeg would be much different today than it is now.

Instead, a century of playing it safe has resulted in a grey, sterile environment.

But it's still home. Fiasco has Detroit, I have Winnipeg.

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As someone who's never set foot in the province, why is everyone hellbent on leaving Manitoba?

Alberta and, to a lesser extent, Saskatchewan have oil. That alone has created economic booms in those provinces (despite them being veritable wastelands compared to the beauty that is Manitoba :)).

Don't get me wrong; most of the graduates find good jobs no problem here - I have, as did most who tried - it's just Manitoba is not doing everything it could to keep itself competitive in the face of the job creation that comes with the black gold further west.

Ultimately, I have confidence in the renewability of Manitoba's resources (primarily hydro-electric power), and Winnipeg as a city is indeed moving forward (not as quickly as others, but progressing), but it is still frustrating to see a significant portion move away.

Thanks. I was under the impression that Manitoba also benefitted from the oil largesse out in that area of Canada.

Some of us move to BC just to get away from the -40c winters, but that's just me.

Manitoba could have been self-sufficient decades ago, had they worked the sales of hydroelectricity to other jurisdictions in similar ways to how Alberta sells oil; had they done that back in the 60's (I believe former mayor Steve Juba tried, and failed), among other things, the face of Winnipeg would be much different today than it is now.

Instead, a century of playing it safe has resulted in a grey, sterile environment.

But it's still home. Fiasco has Detroit, I have Winnipeg.

We do sell more power than any other province, but the fact of the matter is we could be powering much of the Northern United States with the potential we've got, and it's just going to waste.

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As someone who's never set foot in the province, why is everyone hellbent on leaving Manitoba?

Alberta and, to a lesser extent, Saskatchewan have oil. That alone has created economic booms in those provinces (despite them being veritable wastelands compared to the beauty that is Manitoba :)).

Don't get me wrong; most of the graduates find good jobs no problem here - I have, as did most who tried - it's just Manitoba is not doing everything it could to keep itself competitive in the face of the job creation that comes with the black gold further west.

Ultimately, I have confidence in the renewability of Manitoba's resources (primarily hydro-electric power), and Winnipeg as a city is indeed moving forward (not as quickly as others, but progressing), but it is still frustrating to see a significant portion move away.

Thanks. I was under the impression that Manitoba also benefitted from the oil largesse out in that area of Canada.

Some of us move to BC just to get away from the -40c winters, but that's just me.

Manitoba could have been self-sufficient decades ago, had they worked the sales of hydroelectricity to other jurisdictions in similar ways to how Alberta sells oil; had they done that back in the 60's (I believe former mayor Steve Juba tried, and failed), among other things, the face of Winnipeg would be much different today than it is now.

Instead, a century of playing it safe has resulted in a grey, sterile environment.

But it's still home. Fiasco has Detroit, I have Winnipeg.

We do sell more power than any other province, but the fact of the matter is we could be powering much of the Northern United States with the potential we've got, and it's just going to waste.

And right there you have the answer to how to get the Jets back. Start selling that power to the US to the point where the northern US is dependent on Manitobian energy. After five years or so cut it off, and refuse to turn it back on unless the NHL gives Winnipeg the Jets back *evil laugh*

:upside:

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