dfwabel

2017-18 NCAA Football Thread

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14 hours ago, dfwabel said:

Also...

 

Arizona is targeting Navy HC Ken Niumatalolo.

https://www.azcentral.com/story/sports/ncaaf/ua/2018/01/12/ken-niumatalolo-arizona-wildcats-football-coach/1028617001/

 

 

And teams are starting to make their 10th Assistant Coach, who could be hired starting on Tuesday.

For those new to NCAA Bylaws, only those on staff with the official title of a "coach" can be on-field with players and can contact/recruit HS players.

Though it would make life easier for Army, I hope he stays at Navy. I also think the changes they would need to make on offense at Arizona to meet in the middle might lead to a long season in Tucson. 

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9 hours ago, ninersdd said:

Looking like Sumlin to Arizona

 

This makes me even more pissed that ASU went with Herm :censored:ing Edwards over him. Now we have to play against him for at least the next three seasons. 

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Might not have that much to worry about since Sumlin will bring Noel Mazzone and his kid to run the offense. That generally only works through week 5 since the offense is pretty simple but has lots of shifts so good DC can stop it.

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http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2018/jan/16/washington-state-quarterback-tyler-hilinski-commit/

 

Quote

Tyler Hilinski, a redshirt sophomore quarterback on the Washington State football team, was found dead from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head in his apartment Tuesday night, according to Pullman police.

 

A press release said a suicide note was found next to the body.

 

“Pullman Police detectives and the Whitman County Coroner’s Office are conducting a thorough investigation to confirm the suspected cause and manner of death,” police stated in the release.

 

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14 hours ago, dfwabel said:

 

The following post is long and has very little to do with college football but is related to this incident. If either of these points bother you, I don't care.

 

For the most part I could care less about college football. If I spent an hour last year watching college football it was a lot and I couldn't even tell you off the top of my head who won the Heisman because that's how little I care at this point.

 

But this story struck a nerve with me the second I saw it.

 

I'm not going to sit here and try to make sense of things or try to put myself in Hilinski's shoes. I hadn't even heard of him until this morning, but from what I can gather he seemed to be a second-tier QB prospect who was just starting to get his feet under him. He may even had a chance to play in the NFL. We'll never know, but from everything I've heard and can tell, this is someone who would have had a successful life and career whether he had played in the NFL or not.

 

What I will say this is that I'm getting sick and tired of reading these kinds of stories. Kids with seemingly everything going for them and for whatever reason it winds up being too much for them to handle. Some people will point to social media. Some people will point to bullying. Some will even point to both, but in this instance how can either possibly be the case? Starting QB's of D1 schools don't get bullied, and idea that someone in that position could be convinced to do this simply because of social media sounds just as ridiculous. So else was going on? That's a question that will haunt his family for the rest of their lives. I don't know if I could think of a more heartbreaking pain to go though than losing a child simply because they no longer wanted to live. You will never get a complete answer as to why.

 

I'm not saying kids don't get bullied, or bullying can't cause kids to kill themselves. A 12-year old girl that lives 10 minutes from me killed herself over the summer because of bullying. It does happen. But not all depression is caused by bullying and in fact I would argue most of it is not caused by bullying and to focus the conversation on just one or two topics I think completely skips over a lot of what is really going on. The mother of the child I'm referring to was on Megyn Kelly two months later to talk about it. But if her kid committed suicide for any reason other than bullying, I don't think she would have been on TV to talk about it and therein lies the problem, because what makes the circumstances around one child's suicide any more tragic or harder to comprehend than another?

 

My hope is this death can at least slightly change the conversation around this topic. It could be the case that CTE played a role in which case it will probably be just written off as that, but regardless of what cause it, as a society we need to get out of the mentality of "if we could somehow just get rid of this, or just change that, everything would be fine."

 

I haven't read any two suicide stories that sounded exactly the same and I'm sure that will be the case here as well. It speaks to wide diversity of forms depression can take on and I don't think we are at the point as a society where can fully appreciate or accept it.

 

If anyone is struggling with these types of issues all I can say is even as infrequently as I post here these days, my inbox is always open, but whether its me or someone else (hopefully someone else if you're that serious) please talk to somebody before doing something like this. No problem is too small or insignificant not to talk about.

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The scope of bullying has gotten so much worse than when the older among us were kids. It's essentially inescapable and I do think, for that reason, it's worse than it used to be.

 

But the gist of your post is right on.  No amount of money, fame, love, access to sexual partners, "living the dream," or popularity can protect you from mental illness.*  People like Chris Cornell, Chester Bennington, and Robin Williams seemed to live the lives that many of the rest of us envy.  But they also struggled with mental illness.  All the great things that came to them as a result of their talent could not change that.  And there's a lot of ignorance.  I saw a post related to to Hilinski's suicide about "how could he do this; he had it all."  That's pretty close to irrelevant.  I'm sure he was thrilled when he got his scholarship offer.  I'm sure he enjoyed all the things that young, popular people enjoy.  But that's not enough.  

 

*And "mental illness" does not mean "crazy."  It's a largely misunderstood (and, therefore, stigmatized) term.  I have a mental illness; OCD.  I don't wash my hands 100 times a day; it manifests itself differently in everyone.  Have I ever been suicidal?  I'd say, no.  But I have felt "trapped" in my own head and it has occurred to me.  The tragedy is that there's a lot of belief that it's weak to seek counseling and just by doing so, you're crossing some line you can never get back from; like you'll always be "crazy."  More people than many of us realize have a mental illness (I think I read 1 in 5 somewhere; and they are very under-reported).  

 

Your point that bullying gets too much coverage is something I hadn't considered.  I do think there is value to that coverage in that I hope it makes some kids think a bit more about how they are treating people and/or makes some parents do a better job of providing guidance.  But I doubt we'll see a lot on this suicide: "why does a guy who seems to have it all take his own life?"  Robin Williams, an actual celebrity, did not start a conversation, so I don't think a QB from Washington State will.  And just like with bullying, the right dialog could get some people to take action (in this case examine themselves and seek help) and, maybe more importantly, help reduce the stigma.

 

If that 1 in 5 figure is true (and, frankly, even if it isn't), you run across several people batting (often untreated) mental illnesses almost every day.  Kids and adults alike should remember that (including on message boards) when they are interacting with each other.

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4 hours ago, OnWis97 said:

The scope of bullying has gotten so much worse than when the older among us were kids. It's essentially inescapable and I do think, for that reason, it's worse than it used to be.

 

I do wonder about this a lot. Has bullying really gotten that much worse, or is it like police brutality where it really hasn't gotten any worse, we just know more now? Most families in 50's and 60's handled a suicide by simply not talking about it. If you acted up frequently, you were just labeled as a bad kid and that was that.

 

Kids were meant to be spoken to, not listened to and unfortunately a lot of people still have mentality and approach to parenting.

 

By the same token though they didn't have social media back then, and I agree 100% that social media has contributed to the problem more than it has helped it. That was not something anyone born before 1989 really had to deal with in school.

 

No doubt its different, but worse is something I'm not sure about. A lot of it I think depends on the type of person you are and what you're prone to. Just speaking for myself my High School experience as far from great, but I wouldn't want to trade places with any kids growing up now, but that's just me. If I were an LGBT kid I'm sure I much rather be going to school now than 50 years ago. Just depends on your perspective.

 

4 hours ago, OnWis97 said:

Your point that bullying gets too much coverage is something I hadn't considered.  I do think there is value to that coverage in that I hope it makes some kids think a bit more about how they are treating people and/or makes some parents do a better job of providing guidance.  But I doubt we'll see a lot on this suicide: "why does a guy who seems to have it all take his own life?"  Robin Williams, an actual celebrity, did not start a conversation, so I don't think a QB from Washington State will.  And just like with bullying, the right dialog could get some people to take action (in this case examine themselves and seek help) and, maybe more importantly, help reduce the stigma.

 

I want to be careful with what I mean by this, because its very easy to take what I am saying out of context. I'm not accusing you of doing that, but I could see this argument being lumped into these "kids just need to toughen up" aholes who neither understand nor care about the struggles of modern day youths. That would describe the views of 70% of my extended family and it was an issue for me when I was younger. Thankfully I'm at the point now where I can just tell anyone who thinks like this to just f-off, but man I feel bad for the kids who have only these voices to turn to that are going through these types of struggles. The f-off option was not one that was on the table for me as a kid, unless I wanted to be threaten with physical violence from a 60-year old man. But now said 60-year old man is in his 80's and let's just say said threat of violence didn't go as planned the last time around because its pretty difficult to physically intimate a fully grown man who's five inches taller than you and 50-years your junior. But I digress.

 

That's not what I am saying at all. I know bullying can cause suicide happen because it happened near me. Its just that for every one of these "bullycide" incidents I guarantee you there's a least another five suicides that have little if anything to do with bullying, that beyond a quick blurb on the local news or an obituary never get mentioned.

 

I can google Tyler Clementi and it goes straight to his Wikipedia page in addition to dozens of articles detailing every aspect of his life, his suicide and what led up to it. And it makes sense. A gay LGBT student bullied in a very public matter who later killed himself by jumping off the GW bridge that culminated in a very high-profile trial. Who wouldn't be interested in learning more about that story?

 

But its also a story with a very neat and clean narrative. Being a closeted a homosexual already put pressure on him. The public shaming added more pressure and when you look at it from that perspective it makes it a very easy story to follow a long.

 

The problem is suicide, depression and anxiety isn't that clean-cut and simple. It's complex and diverse and if the conversation around these issues isn't as complex and diverse we're always going to be playing catch-up with these issues.

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