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2006 Brewers retro alts are now customizable!


Gothamite

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The MLB online shop has finally released customizable retro Sunday jerseys. But not all members of the team are available - no Yount, no Sveum. The coaches strike out.

Guidelines for Customization

  * League player names must match current team rosters and the team for which they currently play

  * Retired player names cannot be printed on the team's jersey from which they retired

  * Both adult and youth jerseys hold up to 12 characters

  * Characters accepted: capital A-Z (name field only); 0-9 (number field only); spaces

  * Each space counts as one (1) character

  * Language deemed inappropriate, derogatory, or profane will not be accepted

  * If your selection does not meet all of the above criteria you will be prompted to start over

Too bad. They're missing out on a ton of money, not allowing fans to buy Yount jerseys.

I did buy a Yost #3 - lucky for me, when he played for the Crew in 1981 and 1982 he wore #5....

I know that the licensing deal is only for active players, but come on. It's not like these guys aren't part of the current team. They should be able to work out some sort of deal for the club to sell them - even if they split the proceeds with Robin, the team would still be ahead.

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All of these customization rules and regulations are absurd. I'm giving you my money, I should be able to put whatever unique, odd, or dumb name or number on a jersey I like. There's no crime in putting "MEXICO 7", "HE HATE ME 32", or "LOVE BOAT 11" on an NFL jersey, either. If that's how I choose to piddle away my disposable income, then so be it, I say.

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In terms of putting "Mexico" on the jersey (or the like), Sodboy, the leagues know that they're not just selling you a product, but an extension of their brand that people will see. The last thing they want to do is sell something with an NFL shield and something they deem a negative connotation on the same garment.

I see what your point is, but they do have the right to sell you only what they want to sell you.

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It still has Wes Helms on there and he's w/ the Marlins now. Also it's missing some players so I think they don't have an updated roster.

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In terms of putting "Mexico" on the jersey (or the like), Sodboy, the leagues know that they're not just selling you a product, but an extension of their brand that people will see. The last thing they want to do is sell something with an NFL shield and something they deem a negative connotation on the same garment.

I see what your point is, but they do have the right to sell you only what they want to sell you.

I would tend to agree. The league is implicitly endorsing whatever message you put on the jersey, since it's a product with their brand on it that you bought from them. I understand wanting to exercise a small amount of control over that brand.

As for player names, I also understand that players own their own names, and that the league has to license those names for merchandise. That makes sense to me. What doesn't make sense is that they have no license with the MLBP Alumni Association or whatever the organization is for retired players. Surely Yount or Rollie Fingers wouldn't mind the Brewers putting his name on the back of a jersey if it put a couple bucks in his pocket.

So why can't they work some kind of deal for retired players, especially in this case when the retured players are also current members of the team, and wear these jerseys on the field?

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In terms of putting "Mexico" on the jersey (or the like), Sodboy, the leagues know that they're not just selling you a product, but an extension of their brand that people will see. The last thing they want to do is sell something with an NFL shield and something they deem a negative connotation on the same garment.

I see what your point is, but they do have the right to sell you only what they want to sell you.

I would tend to agree. The league is implicitly endorsing whatever message you put on the jersey, since it's a product with their brand on it that you bought from them. I understand wanting to exercise a small amount of control over that brand.

As for player names, I also understand that players own their own names, and that the league has to license those names for merchandise. That makes sense to me. What doesn't make sense is that they have no license with the MLBP Alumni Association or whatever the organization is for retired players. Surely Yount or Rollie Fingers wouldn't mind the Brewers putting his name on the back of a jersey if it put a couple bucks in his pocket.

So why can't they work some kind of deal for retired players, especially in this case when the retured players are also current members of the team, and wear these jerseys on the field?

I think i know why. The MLB probably figures this. Why make you buy a $250 Yount jersey when (if you want it bad enough) they can make you buy one of those nifty Mitchell & Ness Yount jerseys for double the profit?

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Well MLB has some sort of deal with the Alumni - Mitchell & Ness seems to do it without hassle. Majestic had the replica versions, too.

I think i know why. The MLB probably figures this. Why make you buy a $250 Yount jersey when (if you want it bad enough) they can make you buy one of those nifty Mitchell & Ness Yount jerseys for double the profit?

I'm pretty sure MLB would rather directly get the $250 from the consumer than have the consumer buy from Mitchell & Ness. If Mitchell & Ness sells a Yount jersey for $350, MLB probably doesn't see much profit, and certainly not "double". Nearly all of the profit goes to Mitchell & Ness. Yes, M&N pays for licensing fees to produce the jerseys, but no way, no how does MLB make $250 off one M&N jersey.

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Well MLB has some sort of deal with the Alumni - Mitchell & Ness seems to do it without hassle. Majestic had the replica versions, too.
I think i know why. The MLB probably figures this. Why make you buy a $250 Yount jersey when (if you want it bad enough) they can make you buy one of those nifty Mitchell & Ness Yount jerseys for double the profit?

I'm pretty sure MLB would rather directly get the $250 from the consumer than have the consumer buy from Mitchell & Ness. If Mitchell & Ness sells a Yount jersey for $350, MLB probably doesn't see much profit, and certainly not "double". Nearly all of the profit goes to Mitchell & Ness. Yes, M&N pays for licensing fees to produce the jerseys, but no way, no how does MLB make $250 off one M&N jersey.

I think (could be wrong on this one) The MLB shop buys the jerseys from M and N for a sraight fee and the MLB shop makes all the profit on what they sell them for, that is, if M ans N sells the jerseys to the MLB shop wholesale. While M and N does make the jersey, the MLB Shop is still allowing them to use thier site to sell their merchandise, so i think the MLB Shop may make more than you think.

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Well MLB has some sort of deal with the Alumni - Mitchell & Ness seems to do it without hassle.  Majestic had the replica versions, too.
I think i know why. The MLB probably figures this. Why make you buy a $250 Yount jersey when (if you want it bad enough) they can make you buy one of those nifty Mitchell & Ness Yount jerseys for double the profit?

I'm pretty sure MLB would rather directly get the $250 from the consumer than have the consumer buy from Mitchell & Ness. If Mitchell & Ness sells a Yount jersey for $350, MLB probably doesn't see much profit, and certainly not "double". Nearly all of the profit goes to Mitchell & Ness. Yes, M&N pays for licensing fees to produce the jerseys, but no way, no how does MLB make $250 off one M&N jersey.

I think (could be wrong on this one) The MLB shop buys the jerseys from M and N for a sraight fee and the MLB shop makes all the profit on what they sell them for, that is, if M ans N sells the jerseys to the MLB shop wholesale. While M and N does make the jersey, the MLB Shop is still allowing them to use thier site to sell their merchandise, so i think the MLB Shop may make more than you think.

I see where you're coming from and I switch my argument - it makes sense. B) I completely forgot that the MLB site sells M&N jerseys. I was thinking that people would buy M&N jerseys directly from the company (or a shop like Distant Replays), not the MLB site, so that's my mistake.

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The limiting of names to active players has to do with the Collective Bargaining Agreement. Players get a cut when a jersey is customized with their name and number. I'm not sure if it is still in effect, but in the aftermath of the 1994 lockout, you could not get a jersey customized with a player's name if that player was not a member of the MLBPA (i.e.: "Replacement Player") despite that player being on the active roster. Since retired players, managers and coaches are not active MLBPA members, they are also excluded.

Mitchell and Ness signs agreements with individual players, which is why you may see some unusual choices of players on some jerseys (particularly M&N's NHL jerseys). They used to have a policy of not making jerseys of active players, but that seems to have gone out the window a couple of years ago, so I imagine Clemens & Jeter are also being paid by M&N.

Of course, MLB Properties has their hands in all of this, so rest assured the league is getting their slice.

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When did the Brewers start putting names on the backs of their jerseys? I could have sworn there was a short time where they got rid of the pullovers for the button-downs before changing to the script "Brewers" wordmark but didn't put names on the back. I'm not sure if I am remembering this correctly, and someone posting here undoubtably knows this answer for certain.

That said, couldn't you get a nameless #19? Or buy a nameless #19 and have someone customize it for you?

There's gotta be a way to get this done.

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The Brewers first put names on the back after the switch to button-ups in 1992, which coincided with the move to a script "Brewers" wordmark across the chest.

I know that they went without names for the first year at home, and added names for 1993, the final year of the glove logo and old colors. I don't have a reference in front of me, but I think they put names on the road starting in 1992.

I don't think you can order a jersey from the MLB shop with a number but not a name.

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