Ferdinand Cesarano

a very welcome detail on Giants' patch

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In today's UniWatch, we see the patch that the Giants will wear next season:

8188852496_a7235c720b_c.jpg

A beautiful touch is that it says "World Champions", as it ought to. (In other words: not "World Series Champions".)

An aside for my fellow fans of world football: I have become a big fan of soccer over the past decade; so I know that soccer fans around the world would not understand this. In soccer, each country has its domestic league; and that league's winner is the champion of that country. It would be ridiculous to claim that the champs of one league are the "world champions". (The title "world champions" is actually bestowed on the club which wins the Club World Cup, in which the winners of each continent-wide tournament participate. But that tourney is new, and is still not very prestigious.)

Baseball is different. The Major Leagues do not constitute the U.S. domestic league (or even U.S./Canadian domestic league); they constitute the highest league in the world. Every other league, even if it is the top league in another country, is a minor league. (Which is why Ichiro Suzuki was the AL Rookie-of-the-Year in his first year in the Majors.) So the champions of Major League Baseball champion are legitimately the World Champions.

Not only is saying "World Champions" correct; it also sounds right. The latter-day fad of saying "World Series Champions" is an example of creeping kiddie-speak, just as is referring to Major League Baseball as "em el bee".

Even though "World Series Champion" and "em el bee" make me cringe, I'm under no illusion that they are going away. However, it's nice to have a break from at least the former. As a lover of baseball history, of uniform design, and of the English language, I say: good job to the World Champion Giants.

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Acronyms are kind of a part of life. Or do you cringe when you hear NHL too?

I'll meet you half way though. People should treat acronyms the same way they would treat the full phrase. So while "the NHL" makes sense "the MLB" is just stupid.

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That patch is wrong. The only true World Champion is whoever wins the World Baseball Classic. It should say "World Series Champions".

(How's that for an unpopular opinion? :P)

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Speaking of soccer, tons of people say "the MLS." Which drives me insane.

I don't have a problem with the acronyms, although I too hate "World Series Champions" and "Super Bowl Champions." If you won the title of the highest-level competition in the world, you are World Champions. Good on the Giants for saying so.

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"World Series Champions" and "Super Bowl Champions" are factually correct phrases, no matter your take on "world champions".

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The other is not factually incorrect either, unless you can find a higher level of competition.

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That patch is wrong. The only true World Champion is whoever wins the World Baseball Classic. It should say "World Series Champions".

(How's that for an unpopular opinion? :P)

Totally agree. Far from being World Champions.

But, hey, if teams can just make up mythical championships for their patches, I'd say the Washington Nationals should put World Champions patches on their jerseys too since they won the regular season championship of the "best league in the world".

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The difference there is that "the regular season championship" hasn't been acknowledged as a category by the association in over a hundred years. No such thing exists.

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The difference there is that "the regular season championship" hasn't been acknowledged as a category by the association in over a hundred years. No such thing exists.

Right, but my point is the Giants are making up a championship so other teams could make up championships too. Giants are World Series Champions, not World Champions. That's all.

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It's all semantics.

The Pittsburgh Steelers are 6-time Champions of Earth, the Nine Planets and Respective Moons, and the Milky Way Galaxy.

Whatever.

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It's all semantics.

The Pittsburgh Steelers are 6-time Champions of Earth, the Nine Planets and Respective Moons, and the Milky Way Galaxy.

Whatever.

Thanks for reminding me. I'm still jokingly pushing for the Seahawks to put up a Super Bowl XL Champion banner at Century Link since the ref admitted to blown calls. Beyond semantics I know.

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Any significance in the time being 8:40 on the clock?

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That patch is wrong. The only true World Champion is whoever wins the World Baseball Classic. It should say "World Series Champions".

(How's that for an unpopular opinion? :P)

totally agree...unless there is a post season tournament that includes a majority of professional baseball leagues (japanese, mexican, etc.) the world series champion is really only the US/Canada champion...they can't even claim north america.

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Acronyms are kind of a part of life. Or do you cringe when you hear NHL too?

(They aren't acronyms, but only abbreviations. An acronym is said as a word, such as "NATO".)

I do not cringe at the abbreviation NHL read out as letters, nor at NBA or NFL -- nor even at AL or NL. The difference between saying "em el bee" and those others is that it just wasn't done until very recently. People simply said/wrote "Baseball" when they meant Major League Baseball, as in "Baseball commissioner".

Whereas, people have for a very long time referred to other leagues by their letters: "In the NFL and the NBA they do (such-and-such); but in Baseball they do (some other thing)". And even "AL" and "NL" are longstanding usages.

But only in the first decade of the 2000s did the kiddies start to say "em el bee" when they mean Major League Baseball.

"the MLB" is just stupid.

Right; that's taking the kiddie-speak to the next level.

The fact is that "Baseball" is what generations of people grew up saying, in almost all contexts, to refer to Major League Baseball. In the rare case where context was not enough to distinguish in speech between "Baseball" (meaning "Major League Baseball") and "baseball" (meaing the sport itself), then the full words "Major League Baseball" were used.

And "Baseball" even has fewer syllables than "em el bee"!

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Speaking of soccer, tons of people say "the MLS." Which drives me insane.

I want to agree with that; and I used to. But then I found that Major League Lacrosse is totally comfortable with "the MLL". That just seems like a more reasonable position.

But there's no good answer, really. What the names "MLS" and "MLL" actually show is the absurdity of a league's having a name which uses the noun "league" as an adjective! The term "Major League Baseball" (which is what MLS and the MLL copied) was never intended to be the name of any league; it was the name of the association between two formerly independent leagues. Both MLS and the MLL should have thought of something better.

...I too hate "World Series Champions" and "Super Bowl Champions." If you won the title of the highest-level competition in the world, you are World Champions. Good on the Giants for saying so.

It's true that the winners of the Super Bowl are also the World Champions, and have every right to call themselves that. The world soccer model doesn't apply to the NFL any more than it applies to Baseball. However, the term "Super Bowl Champions" has been used for quite some time, often along with the number of the game: "Super Bowl XXI Champions". Whereas, the term "World Series Champions" is extremely new.

The NHL doesn't have this issue; it has been using the term "Stanley Cup Champions" for almost a century.

The NBA is in an interesting position with respect to the question of "World Champions" vs. "NBA Champions". The term "World Champions" was commonplace through the early years of the 21st Century; now "NBA Champions" has come into vogue. (The Celtics, however, held the line, and printed "World Champions" on their most recent banner.) The NBA alone amongst the sports that once used "World Champions" is now starting to position itself as the U.S./Canadian domestic league.

Even if the NBA is the world's best league (just as the English Premier League is the world's best soccer league), and even if it markets itself worldwide (just as does the Premier League), it no longer sees its scope as worldwide. In other words, it's the same "tier" as is, let's say, the Spanish league (regardless of anyone's assessment of the relative levels of play): i.e., the top tier in its country.

This is unlike Baseball and the NFL, which constitute the global top tier of those sports. Of course, in practice, this is not such a big issue in football; but it is worth noting in baseball, which is played at the pro level in Japan and several other countries.

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That patch is wrong. The only true World Champion is whoever wins the World Baseball Classic. It should say "World Series Champions".

We really do take things way too far on here, lol. :)

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Any significance in the time being 8:40 on the clock?

Not that I'd know how to look it up, but is it possible that's what time the clinching game ended? Pacific time, of course

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In today's UniWatch, we see the patch that the Giants will wear next season:

8188852496_a7235c720b_c.jpg

A beautiful touch is that it says "World Champions", as it ought to. (In other words: not "World Series Champions".)

An aside for my fellow fans of world football: I have become a big fan of soccer over the past decade; so I know that soccer fans around the world would not understand this. In soccer, each country has its domestic league; and that league's winner is the champion of that country. It would be ridiculous to claim that the champs of one league are the "world champions". (The title "world champions" is actually bestowed on the club which wins the Club World Cup, in which the winners of each continent-wide tournament participate. But that tourney is new, and is still not very prestigious.)

Baseball is different. The Major Leagues do not constitute the U.S. domestic league (or even U.S./Canadian domestic league); they constitute the highest league in the world. Every other league, even if it is the top league in another country, is a minor league. (Which is why Ichiro Suzuki was the AL Rookie-of-the-Year in his first year in the Majors.) So the champions of Major League Baseball champion are legitimately the World Champions.

Not only is saying "World Champions" correct; it also sounds right. The latter-day fad of saying "World Series Champions" is an example of creeping kiddie-speak, just as is referring to Major League Baseball as "em el bee".

Even though "World Series Champion" and "em el bee" make me cringe, I'm under no illusion that they are going away. However, it's nice to have a break from at least the former. As a lover of baseball history, of uniform design, and of the English language, I say: good job to the World Champion Giants.

disagree 100%. they dont play competition from all over the world. its not the Olympics.

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