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Paul Lukas Anoints a Gumball Helmet King


Mac the Knife

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ah, gumballs...i aint collected any in a while, admittedly...while I like the more realistic appearance of the new model, I wish they came blank with decals like the old ones did. I don't care for the painted on logos/striping at all, to be honest.

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Makes me wonder ... it might take a fair bit of detective work (meaning time), but I can't imagine that it would cost too much to acquire some original dies or molds. And it certainly wouldn't be difficult to make new ones based on existing finished products. And with the right dies, it really isn't very expensive to make little plastic thingies in quantities of several hundred to a thousand. So the real test of commitment to the hobby would be whether a person is willing to throw $5,000 at the problem of reviving craft-scale manufacture of the original helmets to ensure a renewable supply of white blanks.

Anyway, that video was one of the best things Paul has done. They ought to expand it and play it on 60 Minutes or something.

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I used to have a bunch of them too. Currently I have a bunch of the Riddell Pocket Pros, which are better in quality than the old gumballs but have the logos painted on. The only problem is Riddell never finished making all the throwbacks ('74 Eagles and '74 Chargers were never made, nor the '72 Oilers), and now they just make the Revolution design which I don't really like. Another company made the '83 USFL set but didn't make any more after that... :huh:

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I had every team and serveral different editions of each team. Every time my mom went to the grocery store I would get to have two. But because they were in a gumball machine you didn't get to pick so I had like 5 duplicates of alot of the teams. They are now in a box in my basement somewhere.

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Makes me wonder ... it might take a fair bit of detective work (meaning time), but I can't imagine that it would cost too much to acquire some original dies or molds. And it certainly wouldn't be difficult to make new ones based on existing finished products. And with the right dies, it really isn't very expensive to make little plastic thingies in quantities of several hundred to a thousand. So the real test of commitment to the hobby would be whether a person is willing to throw $5,000 at the problem of reviving craft-scale manufacture of the original helmets to ensure a renewable supply of white blanks.

Anyway, that video was one of the best things Paul has done. They ought to expand it and play it on 60 Minutes or something.

I've looked into creating a mold to make the helmet shells myself, but never got very far due to being busy with other things. The one thing I had a hard time even coming close to figuring out how to make was a small custom die-cutter for the decals.

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I used to make my own custom gumball helmets back in the day too. At the time, my goal was create all the helmets of D-1 college teams. I remember struggling to cut out that crescent shape decal to fit on the helmet. That was a pain. I then got caught up collecting the ice cream sundae baseball helmets, which is all I collect now.

I actually have a website set up showing my helmet collections. Unfortunetly it's been a work in progress for the last 6 months so a lot of the helmets aren't posted. If you check back later I'll probably have the gumball baseball and football helmets added. Check it out here. I welcome any feedback.

Did anyone catch if Bill Jones the gumball helmet guy had a website or email? I saw his flickr page, but didn't see a contact or website.

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Did anyone else take away from that that Paul Lukas is a bigger nerd than you otherwise thought? He dresses like a five-year-old.

He is no more a nerd than anyone spending a lot of time on an internet message board specializing in sports logos and uniforms.

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Did anyone else take away from that that Paul Lukas is a bigger nerd than you otherwise thought? He dresses like a five-year-old.

He is no more a nerd than anyone spending a lot of time on an internet message board specializing in sports logos and uniforms.

jim, as always you are the harbinger of light in a cave of ignorance based stalagmites.

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Did anyone else take away from that that Paul Lukas is a bigger nerd than you otherwise thought? He dresses like a five-year-old.

He is no more a nerd than anyone spending a lot of time on an internet message board specializing in sports logos and uniforms.

Well, yes, that's the easy response. However, I don't were green t-shirts tucked into my big boy jeans when I know I'm going to be broadcast in front of thousands of people. The other guy spend hundreds of hours making little football helmets but still managed to outclass Lukas. That's all I'm saying.

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Did you eat a bowl of angryflakes or something today?

He went to interview a guy who makes gumball football helmets. He's not presenting a case to the House Subcommittee on Fiscal Overspending.

Paul knows his audience. It's not like what we wore was distracting anyone's attention (but yours) away from the subject. He writes a blog about sports logos and uniforms. I think he can get by dressing like a fanboy, or at least a little more casual than the average interviewer.

Lately, it seems like you are intentionally finding fault with what people enjoy here. Why put a bigger target on yourself to be flamed?

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it wasnt the point of the article, but why werent sport card companies not allowed to show the logos on the cards back in the day?

Licensing fees. Stating the name was ok, but Topps (and others) had to pay extra to show the logos.

I know it wasn't until the early 80's that you would see an NFL team's logo on its helmets.

I don't think it was an issue with baseball, unless you count the Kellogg's/Drakes/Hostess cards in the late 70's/early 80's.

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it wasnt the point of the article, but why werent sport card companies not allowed to show the logos on the cards back in the day?

Licensing fees. Stating the name was ok, but Topps (and others) had to pay extra to show the logos.

I know it wasn't until the early 80's that you would see an NFL team's logo on its helmets.

I don't think it was an issue with baseball, unless you count the Kellogg's/Drakes/Hostess cards in the late 70's/early 80's.

ah i see, thanks for that, i do remember that the cereal cards never had the logos, up until the 90's and probably to this day?

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