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New Spring Professional Football League in the works

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http://deadspin.com/5878954/exclusive-here-are-plans-for-a-new-professional-football-league-run-by-former-nfl-xfl-and-usfl-executives

From the article/45 page embedded document linked above.

Former XFL & NFL execs. aiming to create a professional spring football league with a 14-16 game season by 2013.

Targeted cities are New York, Washington, Memphis, Orlando, Charlotte, Chicago, Detroit, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Denver, Dallas, Phoenix, Houston, Los Angeles, and Seattle...teams would be centrally owned by the league.

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Because going to a bunch of NFL cities will work fantastically...

With Spring football? I think it will...

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Because this has worked so well the last 5 times they've tried it... :rolleyes:

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Because going to a bunch of NFL cities will work fantastically...

That's what caught me off guard...figured they'd at least incorporate a few non-NFL cities. Apparently they've "learned" from the mistakes of the USFL & XFL.

Looking at their timeline the league is already working on logos/designs so it should be interesting to see how much info they share.

Within the document there is mentioning of jersey sponsorship or at least I interpreted it as being open to the idea of it.

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Honestly, I know it has been said before, but there is definitely a nitch that could be carved out in the spring when there is very little football related news... Almost an NFL-DL, you could say.

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The problem is the lack of talent. Few people in the States are going to watch sub-NFL talent without gimmicks. The reason why the NFL was threatened by the USFL was because the USFL had really good players.

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Honestly, I know it has been said before, but there is definitely a nitch that could be carved out in the spring when there is very little football related news... Almost an NFL-DL, you could say.

It's been said here before, but the NFL does have a development league: Division 1 college football.

Nobody in their right mind will build a business plan around a b-squad football league, especially with major cities as your primary markets. It doesn't make sense. Consumers don't want to shell out $45 to go to watch the equivalent of an NFL practice squad play in a 70k seat stadium.

I know this country supposedly has an insatiable appetite for football. But I can't see any circumstance where a league with inferior talent can work. It's too much of an investment with too little return.

The only reason the AFL and the USFL got any traction is because they were able to poach big-name college talent and lure away established NFL vets with big $$. Based on the business plan posted on Deadspin, this new league doesn't plant to compete with the NFL for talent. So where is it going to come from?

Honestly, I don't know how anybody can hear a pitch on a new professional football league and come out saying, "I think this could work." It's like the USFL's near success, if you can call it that, created some sort of irrepressible hope -- or delusion.

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Honestly, I know it has been said before, but there is definitely a nitch that could be carved out in the spring when there is very little football related news... Almost an NFL-DL, you could say.

It's been said here before, but the NFL does have a development league: Division 1 college football.

Nobody in their right mind will build a business plan around a b-squad football league, especially with major cities as your primary markets. It doesn't make sense. Consumers don't want to shell out $45 to go to watch the equivalent of an NFL practice squad play in a 70k seat stadium.

I know this country supposedly has an insatiable appetite for football. But I can't see any circumstance where a league with inferior talent can work. It's too much of an investment with too little return.

The only reason the AFL and the USFL got any traction is because they were able to poach big-name college talent and lure away established NFL vets with big $$. Based on the business plan posted on Deadspin, this new league doesn't plant to compete with the NFL for talent. So where is it going to come from?

Honestly, I don't know how anybody can hear a pitch on a new professional football league and come out saying, "I think this could work." It's like the USFL's near success, if you can call it that, created some sort of irrepressible hope -- or delusion.

The NBA has College Basketball, but isn't the D-League working there?

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Honestly, I know it has been said before, but there is definitely a nitch that could be carved out in the spring when there is very little football related news... Almost an NFL-DL, you could say.

It's been said here before, but the NFL does have a development league: Division 1 college football.

Nobody in their right mind will build a business plan around a b-squad football league, especially with major cities as your primary markets. It doesn't make sense. Consumers don't want to shell out $45 to go to watch the equivalent of an NFL practice squad play in a 70k seat stadium.

I know this country supposedly has an insatiable appetite for football. But I can't see any circumstance where a league with inferior talent can work. It's too much of an investment with too little return.

The only reason the AFL and the USFL got any traction is because they were able to poach big-name college talent and lure away established NFL vets with big $$. Based on the business plan posted on Deadspin, this new league doesn't plant to compete with the NFL for talent. So where is it going to come from?

Honestly, I don't know how anybody can hear a pitch on a new professional football league and come out saying, "I think this could work." It's like the USFL's near success, if you can call it that, created some sort of irrepressible hope -- or delusion.

The NBA has College Basketball, but isn't the D-League working there?

You don't have to go to college to be in the NBA D-League. And oh yeah, it's run by the NBA. If you think non-NFL affiliated spring football can survive on 2,000 fans like it does in the NBA D-League...

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What's to stop players from signing with a spring team during the NFL's offseason? They play NFL in the fall and winter and SPFL in the spring and summer. It would help them keep in shape.

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Honestly, I know it has been said before, but there is definitely a nitch that could be carved out in the spring when there is very little football related news... Almost an NFL-DL, you could say.

It's been said here before, but the NFL does have a development league: Division 1 college football.

Nobody in their right mind will build a business plan around a b-squad football league, especially with major cities as your primary markets. It doesn't make sense. Consumers don't want to shell out $45 to go to watch the equivalent of an NFL practice squad play in a 70k seat stadium.

I know this country supposedly has an insatiable appetite for football. But I can't see any circumstance where a league with inferior talent can work. It's too much of an investment with too little return.

The only reason the AFL and the USFL got any traction is because they were able to poach big-name college talent and lure away established NFL vets with big $$. Based on the business plan posted on Deadspin, this new league doesn't plant to compete with the NFL for talent. So where is it going to come from?

Honestly, I don't know how anybody can hear a pitch on a new professional football league and come out saying, "I think this could work." It's like the USFL's near success, if you can call it that, created some sort of irrepressible hope -- or delusion.

The NBA has College Basketball, but isn't the D-League working there?

You don't have to go to college to be in the NBA D-League. And oh yeah, it's run by the NBA. If you think non-NFL affiliated spring football can survive on 2,000 fans like it does in the NBA D-League...

And the D-League's surviving in places like Maine, Fort Wayne and Bismarck. It's following the model of Major League Baseball via league affiliation, allowing the potential for big-league call-ups. That brings a whole different level of incentive for small-market fans to come and watch.

That's much harder to do in pro football. The NFL doesn't want to own and doesn't need an additional talent pipeline. And operating a professional football league of any quality in a D-League market is a non-starter on expense alone.

What's to stop players from signing with a spring team during the NFL's offseason? They play NFL in the fall and winter and SPFL in the spring and summer. It would help them keep in shape.

Doing that would almost certainly void their NFL contract. No NFL team would risk their investment in a player by allowing them to suit-up for a rival league.

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The issue with spring leagues is whether they can come up with a workable realistic business plan. The USFL actually did ok in spring, it was only when it moved to fall to compete directly against the NFL that it got squished.

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The issue with spring leagues is whether they can come up with a workable realistic business plan. The USFL actually did ok in spring, it was only when it moved to fall to compete directly against the NFL that it got squished.

1987 was a very long time ago. The sports scene wasn't nearly as saturated as it is today, nor was there as much competition for entertainment dollars.

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The issue with spring leagues is whether they can come up with a workable realistic business plan. The USFL actually did ok in spring, it was only when it moved to fall to compete directly against the NFL that it got squished.

1987 was a very long time ago. The sports scene wasn't nearly as saturated as it is today, nor was there as much competition for entertainment dollars.

Again, it all comes back to the business model. If you want to challenge the NFL, you probably don't stand a chance. But if you're looking for a growth league, maybe more of a rival for the MLS, then it seems something of a goer.

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They might as well throw their investment cash into a fire pit. Starting a new football with any success is as risky (or foolish) as starting a new airline in the U.S.

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The issue with spring leagues is whether they can come up with a workable realistic business plan. The USFL actually did ok in spring, it was only when it moved to fall to compete directly against the NFL that it got squished.

1987 was a very long time ago. The sports scene wasn't nearly as saturated as it is today, nor was there as much competition for entertainment dollars.

Again, it all comes back to the business model. If you want to challenge the NFL, you probably don't stand a chance. But if you're looking for a growth league, maybe more of a rival for the MLS, then it seems something of a goer.

I guess it depends on how you define rival. If you mean rival, as in going head-to-head against the NFL in fall, it's a non-starter. But even a spring football league doesn't stand a chance. I can't see how a professional football league can function when built on NFL also-rans or never-will-bes. Just watch 5 minutes of a UFL game and the distinction is clear.

The only way a viable second-tier pro football league can work, in my opinion, is if the NFL is somehow involved. And I don't see that ever happening.

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I agree on both counts.

For all I rag on MLS for the relatively poor football they play, at least it's the highest level of competition in the United States. I just don't see how a football league can financially compete if all it has to offer is second- or third-tier talent.

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? Make the UFL the official D-League of the NFL.

? Make them play in small market locations (Omaha, Alabama, Orlando, OKC, etc.) during the spring.

? Everyone wins.

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