aztex82

Soda/Pop/Branding Discussion & News Thread

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, Pharos04 said:

 

Not going to like, Moxie is very hit-or-miss for people.  you either like it, or are absolutely disgusted by it.  "Acquired taste" is an understatement.  When I was in the Air Force and stationed all around the US I had family ship me bottles and I would share with everyone to see how they reacted.  Some enjoyed it and wanted more, some were repulsed by it. 

 

Personally I've been around it all my life and grew up with it, so I love it.  especially good in the summer with some French Vanilla ice cream to make a Moxie float.  I've been tempted to go to Lisbon, ME at some point and join in the Moxie Festival where they have a Moxie chugging contest.  I think one of the more recent winners drank it warm. 

 

I'm one who is disgusted by it. And 13 year old kids being 13 year old kids, once word got out about how terrible I thought Moxie was, they all wanted to try it for themselves. So my bottle got passed around and waterfalled by the kids who all also thought it was disgusting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, BringBackTheVet said:

I"ve been reading some fascinating articles of how soda bottling / distribution works, specifically relating to Dr. Pepper / 7up.  

 

So since Dr. Pepper originally split themselves between Coke and Pepsi bottlers in different markets, they effectively blocked any national competition, which was pretty damn smart.   Coke makes Mr. Pibb, which they bottle and distribute in the markets where Pepsi bottlers distribute Dr. Pepper.  Now that more Coke bottlers make Dr. Pepper, Mr. Pibb is basically only in a few regional markets.

 

What I don't get is why Pepsi hasn't come out with their own competitor to sell in markets where Coke makes Dr. Pepper.

Soda sales are at a 30 year low.  And until the consolidation of the distributors from the Pepsico itself, it also is about if the bottler/distributor thought it was worth the time and effort to buy the syrup to bottle and market it properly.  

If you haven't come across this, I posted this in the Sierra Mist redesign thread earlier this year, but a former beverage executive wrote about how a Dr. Pepper CEO went to the FDA to change the classification of Dr. Pepper and locked out the other local distributor.

https://medium.com/marketing-today/soft-drink-distribution-is-fascinating-8aecdcb016fc

Edited by dfwabel
link added

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Haha that's one of the articles I came across and read while googling yesterday.  That's the one that actually left me with the question of why Pepsi didn't come out with their own Mr. Pibb for the markets in which their bottler didn't bottle Dr. Pepper.

 

It also seems like bottling is a monopoly, since you can't start up a bottling company and compete for a coke or pepsi contract since there's territorial rights like in baseball.

 

I also now don't understand how much of the promotions you see are from the bottlers or from coke / pepsi.  It would seem like they'd want more control over how their product is marketed, but it seems like the distributors are the ones that are in the stores doing all that.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, BringBackTheVet said:

Haha that's one of the articles I came across and read while googling yesterday.  That's the one that actually left me with the question of why Pepsi didn't come out with their own Mr. Pibb for the markets in which their bottler didn't bottle Dr. Pepper.

 

It also seems like bottling is a monopoly, since you can't start up a bottling company and compete for a coke or pepsi contract since there's territorial rights like in baseball.

 

I also now don't understand how much of the promotions you see are from the bottlers or from coke / pepsi.  It would seem like they'd want more control over how their product is marketed, but it seems like the distributors are the ones that are in the stores doing all that.

 

 

Bottling as a monopoly is a recent phenomenon.

http://www.valueline.com/Stocks/Commentary.aspx?id=8421#.XADQ4aCIbZ8

 

NYT or MarketWatch has many articles on the consolidation and why.

 

Coca Cola North America basically went from independent bottlers to being consolidated under CCE, but not more independent. Less in number but more coverage for independent bottlers.

https://www.coca-colacompany.com/press-center/press-releases/tccc-completes-refranchising-of-company-owned-bottling-operations-in-us

 

PepsiCo started its consolidation a decade later and is keeping as much as they can in-house. There's only 33 independent Pepsi bottlers within their association.

https://pcba.net/membership/

 

Something also occurred in the mid-90s which influenced the bottlers to be bought by corporate... Pouring Rights became MUCH more valuable.

 

Not just in stadiums, and restaurants, but universities and high schools became really valuable. If you could freeze out your competition on a college campus for five years, that's a mini-monopoly and possibly getting brand lifers.

 

Then again soda, beer/wine/spirits, and for the most part general grocery industry still possesses a three tiered system of getting goods from maker to consumer via both a distributor and a retailer.

 

 

Manufacturer/Distributor/Retailer/Consumer

 

 

Edited by dfwabel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now