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Interesting use of the Dolphins' Logo


buckeyes

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Oh wow, wasn't expecting anything like that. Is that even legal? I can't imagine the Dolphins would want something that is so obviously their logo used to represent a gun...

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Does anyone find that trashy and stupid? Chances are if you are wearing that shirt you suck at life.

Trashy and stupid yes, but you can't deny that it's fairly well designed.

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It's legal under it's a parody of life. I'm serious on that. You can take an image, make a parody of it about something in life and you're perfectly legal. I don't know if there have been any Dolphins arrested for possession of guns, if so it could be a statement about that, or it could be a statement about the quarterback having a gun for an arm. Whether the Dolphins like the image is a different story, they can't legally do anything except put pressure on the people who produce the shirt, but they can keep you out of their facility for wearing it. This would go under Fair Use, based on it being a parody of some sort.

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It's legal under it's a parody of life. I'm serious on that. You can take an image, make a parody of it about something in life and you're perfectly legal. I don't know if there have been any Dolphins arrested for possession of guns, if so it could be a statement about that, or it could be a statement about the quarterback having a gun for an arm. Whether the Dolphins like the image is a different story, they can't legally do anything except put pressure on the people who produce the shirt, but they can keep you out of their facility for wearing it. This would go under Fair Use, based on it being a parody of some sort.

What about the font though? Is that a custom font registered to the Miami Dolphins or is it a widely used font?

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It's legal under it's a parody of life. I'm serious on that. You can take an image, make a parody of it about something in life and you're perfectly legal. I don't know if there have been any Dolphins arrested for possession of guns, if so it could be a statement about that, or it could be a statement about the quarterback having a gun for an arm. Whether the Dolphins like the image is a different story, they can't legally do anything except put pressure on the people who produce the shirt, but they can keep you out of their facility for wearing it. This would go under Fair Use, based on it being a parody of some sort.

Don't they still need permission to do a parody? I remember hearing an interview with Weird Al. Interviewer asked him if Michael Jackson ever got mad at him for the songs. He said he always has to get his permission first.

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It's legal under it's a parody of life. I'm serious on that. You can take an image, make a parody of it about something in life and you're perfectly legal. I don't know if there have been any Dolphins arrested for possession of guns, if so it could be a statement about that, or it could be a statement about the quarterback having a gun for an arm. Whether the Dolphins like the image is a different story, they can't legally do anything except put pressure on the people who produce the shirt, but they can keep you out of their facility for wearing it. This would go under Fair Use, based on it being a parody of some sort.

Don't they still need permission to do a parody? I remember hearing an interview with Weird Al. Interviewer asked him if Michael Jackson ever got mad at him for the songs. He said he always has to get his permission first.

Weird Al created a lot of controversy about a decade ago for making a parody of Coolio's Gangsters Paradise without permission. Coolio got so pissed about it that it basically ended his career.

So no, I don't think you HAVE to get permission to make a parody, it's just a really good idea.

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It's legal under it's a parody of life. I'm serious on that. You can take an image, make a parody of it about something in life and you're perfectly legal. I don't know if there have been any Dolphins arrested for possession of guns, if so it could be a statement about that, or it could be a statement about the quarterback having a gun for an arm. Whether the Dolphins like the image is a different story, they can't legally do anything except put pressure on the people who produce the shirt, but they can keep you out of their facility for wearing it. This would go under Fair Use, based on it being a parody of some sort.

Don't they still need permission to do a parody? I remember hearing an interview with Weird Al. Interviewer asked him if Michael Jackson ever got mad at him for the songs. He said he always has to get his permission first.

Weird Al created a lot of controversy about a decade ago for making a parody of Coolio's Gangsters Paradise without permission. Coolio got so pissed about it that it basically ended his career.

So no, I don't think you HAVE to get permission to make a parody, it's just a really good idea.

I'm not convinced that the "controversy" wasn't staged to boost both their careers. But yes, your point is correct - Wierd Al secures rights to each of the songs he parodies, and pays royalties to the artists. But that's because his parodies are commerical works for profit - non-commercial parodies don't need permission.

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It's legal under it's a parody of life. I'm serious on that. You can take an image, make a parody of it about something in life and you're perfectly legal. I don't know if there have been any Dolphins arrested for possession of guns, if so it could be a statement about that, or it could be a statement about the quarterback having a gun for an arm. Whether the Dolphins like the image is a different story, they can't legally do anything except put pressure on the people who produce the shirt, but they can keep you out of their facility for wearing it. This would go under Fair Use, based on it being a parody of some sort.

Don't they still need permission to do a parody? I remember hearing an interview with Weird Al. Interviewer asked him if Michael Jackson ever got mad at him for the songs. He said he always has to get his permission first.

Weird Al created a lot of controversy about a decade ago for making a parody of Coolio's Gangsters Paradise without permission. Coolio got so pissed about it that it basically ended his career.

So no, I don't think you HAVE to get permission to make a parody, it's just a really good idea.

I'm not convinced that the "controversy" wasn't staged to boost both their careers. But yes, your point is correct - Wierd Al secures rights to each of the songs he parodies, and pays royalties to the artists. But that's because his parodies are commerical works for profit - non-commercial parodies don't need permission.

Two points:

1. I heard Weird Al say that Coolio had actually agreed to it beforehand, but either misunderstood or "misremembered". They patched things up later.

2. Al said that legally he doesn't need permission to do the songs (because the artists would still get royalties), but he always gets it anyway. The only time someone didn't give permission was when he wanted to do "Live and Let Die" as "Chicken Pot Pie." Paul McCartney didn't want it because he is a vegetarian.

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