Jump to content

Which of these potential markets can best support an NBA team?


colortv

Recommended Posts

Honestly, as a Kansas City resident, I don't think we could support another pro team. Yea, everyone would be interested at first, but unless the team starts winning championships, people would get bored of it. I'm all for an NBA or NHL team coming in, but I just don't think it'll happen. Especially with AEG running the Sprint Center.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Seattle, Vancouver, Pittsburgh, San Diego, Nashville, St Louis, Kansas City?

I'm particularly surprised that Missouri, with a population over 6 million hasn't had in NBA team for 20 years.

All of the above, except Kansas City and Nashville.

St. Louis and Pittsburgh are tapped out too methinks.

From the cities mentioned, let's look at some seven simple things for each city.

San Diego: No facility

Seattle: Just a temporary facility currently there

Kansas City: No owner wants to move there and AEG still makes money running that facility in booking events.

St. Louis: The Blues own and control the building.

Vancouver: The Canucks own and control the building.

Nashville: The Predators control the building, but the city/county also assisted to pay the expansion fee.

Pittsburgh: The Penguins control the building.

"Control" is generally defined as able to keep all revenue from games (NHL/NBA/AFL...) and other events, concessions, the sale of luxury suites and premium seating, merchandise, novelties/programs, sponsorships and arena advertising.

If the secondary tenant cannot receive premium revenues, there is NO reason for them to move into such a situation, unless there is also a change in ownership to the current tenant/leaseholder. There is no gate revenue to be made, so those teams would have to have to have an enormous local TV deal to survive.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think whenever this kind of topic comes up, uninformed kids just look at whatever cities have other pro teams and instantly think that they could or should have more. The fact is that if all pro leagues were starting out today, several cities that currently have NHL, NBA, even NFL or MLB teams wouldn't even be on the short list to receive teams, and due to their declining socioeconomic significance, you'd probably never have even heard of them. That's not to say that they aren't nice places, but not ones that you'd ever hear anything about if not for the pro teams that currently play there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think whenever this kind of topic comes up, uninformed kids just look at whatever cities have other pro teams and instantly think that they could or should have more. The fact is that if all pro leagues were starting out today, several cities that currently have NHL, NBA, even NFL or MLB teams wouldn't even be on the short list to receive teams, and due to their declining socioeconomic significance, you'd probably never have even heard of them. That's not to say that they aren't nice places, but not ones that you'd ever hear anything about if not for the pro teams that currently play there.

Buffalevelandattiburghmore.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The NBA's answer may well end up being "none of the above". They have historically had a thing for relatively small markets that were previously Big-Four-virgin territory (Portland, Phoenix, Indianapolis, San Antonio, Salt Lake City, Sacramento, Charlotte, Orlando, Memphis, Oklahoma City - that's one-third of the current slate of NBA markets right there, though it was the now-New Orleans Hornets, not the current Bobcats, that were Charlotte's first pro team).

Among currently untapped markets, Louisville has a still-fairly-new NBA-ready arena in the Yum! Center. Then of course there's Las Vegas, whose candidacy has been discussed to death already elsewhere; and the Virginia Beach/Hampton Roads area now flirting with the Kings. They may be more likely candidates to land an NBA franchise than any of the ones discussed so far, except Seattle. Hell, even Omaha (which also has a somewhat newish NBA-sized arena and used to co-host the Kings with KC back in the day) could be in the mix.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do pro sports really work well in non-urban areas without great public trans to/from the arenas? Going to a game shouldn't be a hassle or something that you have to "plan a night" for, and it seems like that might be the case when arenas are built in sprawling "suburban"-ish areas.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To make this topic more relevant,

Virginia Beach, VA is talking about a new arena, possibly for the Kings. Hampton Roads (Norfolk area) is the smallest metro area in the U.S. besides Vegas with no major pro sports team. Thoughts?

I take it you mean largest? Does that market get close enough to the Washington/Baltimore market?

Personally I would like Seattle to get a team back, more because I really liked the Sonics unis. But that's not the kind of reason the NBA will take into account! But as a city, as far as I can tell from an Ocean and a Continent away, Seattleites have always supported their sporting teams pretty well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.