Jump to content

There's Baseball Crack on Youtube


the admiral

Recommended Posts

http://www.youtube.com/user/ClassicMLB11/videos

http://www.youtube.com/user/classicmlb1122/videos

oh sweet lord there's SO MUCH

Harry Caray doing a game with the "dominant" Pittsburgh Pirate against the Chicago Cub on channel 9.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShnnIGzzFFQ

Harry and Jimmy doing the New York Yankee against the White Sock on channel 9!

Cardinals-Giants. Jay Randolph was a really good announcer. Mike Shannon never was.

Find games worth sharing!

I like the way baseball looked back then. So much simpler.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, MLB has gotten EXTREMELY lax with videos being uploaded onto youtube ever since they realized that embracing the internet is a much better way to go about things than to fight against it. Hell, the video that Hedley just posted was uploaded BY MLB. It's a beautiful thing, and it's definitely gonna help me once I start missing baseball around Christmas time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Harry Kalas "Chase Utley You Are The Man" (too bad dbag Chris Wheeler is doing color and never shuts up.)

Phillies 1980 NLCS opening, circa 1980 - Harry Kalas and Richie "Whitey" Ashburn

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, MLB has gotten EXTREMELY lax with videos being uploaded onto youtube ever since they realized that embracing the internet is a much better way to go about things than to fight against it. Hell, the video that Hedley just posted was uploaded BY MLB. It's a beautiful thing, and it's definitely gonna help me once I start missing baseball around Christmas time.

Yeah, when you think about something like that game...how much money will they ever make trying to "sell" it? It probably makes more sense to just let people watch historic/exciting games and moments to generate interest. I know I am going to probably watch pieces of this game, Game 7, 2001, etc.

Edit: Even knowing the results and general flow of the game, the lack of scorebug drives me nuts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The mid-'90s were an interesting time for baseball announcing/production. We were coming out of the bad old days of cookie-cutters and powder blue pullovers,so the games were starting to look like baseball games look today, but we still had lots of great announcers around, and so things didn't feel nearly as sanitized in that respect. For instance, watching Clemens's 20-strikeout game was cool. Watching Clemens's 20-strikeout game as called by Ernie Harwell was an absolute treat.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, MLB has gotten EXTREMELY lax with videos being uploaded onto youtube ever since they realized that embracing the internet is a much better way to go about things than to fight against it. Hell, the video that Hedley just posted was uploaded BY MLB. It's a beautiful thing, and it's definitely gonna help me once I start missing baseball around Christmas time.

The NFL needs to follow suit and let it go instead of over-policing You-Tube and trying to sweep things under the rug that could kill their sport, like the concussion issue and cheating (they really didn't punish the Pats that much).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The mid-'90s were an interesting time for baseball announcing/production. We were coming out of the bad old days of cookie-cutters and powder blue pullovers,so the games were starting to look like baseball games look today, but we still had lots of great announcers around, and so things didn't feel nearly as sanitized in that respect. For instance, watching Clemens's 20-strikeout game was cool. Watching Clemens's 20-strikeout game as called by Ernie Harwell was an absolute treat.

To add to your point, the blend of 1980s and older announcing with the modern day presentation of baseball was one aspect of a dynamic shift in sports around two decades ago. As confusing as times are now, they were a hell of a lot more chaotic in the mid-1990s. Not just in baseball, but all sports. And not just in broadcasting, but in TV rights, stadiums, jerseys, team relocations. The only league with a stable ebb and flow in the decade was the NBA, as they had consistency around television (NBC and Turner), franchise stability (no relocations in the decade), aesthetics and stadiums. For the other leagues, chaos between the networks, franchises, finances and other such factors were apparent.

All the events which happened in that period paved way for how we view sports today. And in the period, some of the old guard in national sports commentating had to relinquish their microphones (Vin Scully, Pat Summerall, John Madden, Jon Miller, Dick Enberg, Gary Thorne, etc) to allow the current crop of broadcasters to take the stage (Gus Johnson, Joe Buck [grudgingly], Jim Nantz, Mike Breen, etc).

I agree. There's something about watching near-modern games called by broadcasters of the past which make it extra special. I'm glad MLB is finally nutting up and dissolving their totalitarian policy towards YouTube videos.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's a crime that they don't make baseball announcers like they used to. It's so sad that Joe Buck and Matt Vasgersian are considered the ideal broadcasters now. I mean, you can argue that there were bad broadcasters during the golden age, too, it's just that we just don't remember them fondly (I happened upon Early Wynn doing a game and hoooooo boy), but even mediocre members of the old guard like Dave Niehaus or Denny Matthews are worlds better at their craft than, say, Daron Sutton or Thom Brennaman. It's a good thing we have guys like Pat Hughes, Jon Miller, and Jim Powell, who are almost neoclassical in their approach, but even then, what makes them good is that they're doing their best to stay true to a tradition of capital-letters Great Announcing without necessarily adding to the continuum.

You know, I might legit tear up a little when Uecker dies, and I'm not even a Brewers fan.

EDIT: Joe Garagiola! They sure as hell don't make Joe Garagiolas anymore. Who was the last baseball player to transcend baseball and be that kind of a versatile general public personality? If he were a player today, he'd just mumble that we've gotta take it one day at a time out there, and his nickname would be "J-Garj."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Any game called by Vin Scully and Joe Garagiola is automatically at least 34% better than any game they didn't call.

Throw in Curt Gowdy and I'm with you.

Also, I consider myself spoiled to be old enough to have heard a lot of Chuck Thompson.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Any game called by Vin Scully and Joe Garagiola is automatically at least 34% better than any game they didn't call.

As I was saying...

I remember this game. I watched the first six innings on TV with Vin and Joe calling it. Then I had to go out so I listened to the last three on the radio with Ernie Harwell. The perfect storm of baseball announcing. Also, baseball was so much "bigger" back when there was only on national game of the week. NBC's GOTW was appointment TV back then.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.