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2010 LeBron James Sweepstakes


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Deal has been proposed to Minnesota and Wiggins isn't involved.

Dion Waiters, Anthony Bennett, and a package of picks for Love.

I don't see how this is in any way better than the Lee and Barnes or Thompson package from the Dubs. Any deal made with the Cavs that doesn't involve Wiggins is a shot in the foot, but then again it is the T-Wolves we are talking about

The T-Wolves will do it. And nobody in the front office meeting will say "wait a second, won't LeBron's arrival mean that those picks won't be that high?"

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Word is that LeBron told Wade on the flight back to Miami that he was going back to Cleveland. LeBron told Bosh, "Do what you gotta do," reportedly. If that matters.

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The pictures of LeBron's cars leaving his Miami home? Those cars are arriving at LeBron's Cleveland mansion right now, just in case you were concerned.

---

edit: Here's the cover of tomorrow's Plain Dealer

15388215-mmmain.jpg

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I really want to know what was said in that meeting with the Cavs. Talking heads said it was personal as hell but apparently they worked it out. LeBron is a better man than me because I wouldn't go back. If I did go back I'm coming for the throne (aka significant ownership) when I hang em up and some super Saiyan level groveling from Gilbert on top of it.

I'm happy for LeBron though. For what it's worth his wife put this in the air weeks ago, and happy wife equals happy life. He is also changing the narrative by becoming the mentor, IN HIS PRIME. LeBron is a different dude on so many levels.

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The important thing is this:

Please Cavs do not change your uniforms for this. Your look is great...Let LeBron make it beloved.

Lol, that's one thing I'm not looking forward to, I can't stand their current look. So many flaws.......

Props to LeBron for handling this whole thing so well this time around. I've supported LeBron through most of his Heat tenure, and I'll continue to support him now. As a Heat fan since the Zo days, thanks for a great 4-year run, and hope you can find success back home.

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I really want to know what was said in that meeting with the Cavs. Talking heads said it was personal as hell but apparently they worked it out. LeBron is a better man than me because I wouldn't go back. If I did go back I'm coming for the throne (aka significant ownership) when I hang em up and some super Saiyan level groveling from Gilbert on top of it.

I'm happy for LeBron though. For what it's worth his wife put this in the air weeks ago, and happy wife equals happy life. He is also changing the narrative by becoming the mentor, IN HIS PRIME. LeBron is a different dude on so many levels.

If no one else gets anything else out of any of this...please get that. Sports to the side, that's one of the realest quips you'll ever read.

Also, for anyone who by chance hasn't read the letter:

Before anyone ever cared where I would play basketball, I was a kid from Northeast Ohio. It’s where I walked. It’s where I ran. It’s where I cried. It’s where I bled. It holds a special place in my heart. People there have seen me grow up. I sometimes feel like I’m their son. Their passion can be overwhelming. But it drives me. I want to give them hope when I can. I want to inspire them when I can. My relationship with Northeast Ohio is bigger than basketball. I didn’t realize that four years ago. I do now.

Remember when I was sitting up there at the Boys & Girls Club in 2010? I was thinking, This is really tough. I could feel it. I was leaving something I had spent a long time creating. If I had to do it all over again, I’d obviously do things differently, but I’d still have left. Miami, for me, has been almost like college for other kids. These past four years helped raise me into who I am. I became a better player and a better man. I learned from a franchise that had been where I wanted to go. I will always think of Miami as my second home. Without the experiences I had there, I wouldn’t be able to do what I’m doing today.

I went to Miami because of D-Wade and CB. We made sacrifices to keep UD. I loved becoming a big bro to Rio. I believed we could do something magical if we came together. And that’s exactly what we did! The hardest thing to leave is what I built with those guys. I’ve talked to some of them and will talk to others. Nothing will ever change what we accomplished. We are brothers for life. I also want to thank Micky Arison and Pat Riley for giving me an amazing four years.

I’m doing this essay because I want an opportunity to explain myself uninterrupted. I don’t want anyone thinking: He and Erik Spoelstra didn’t get along. … He and Riles didn’t get along. …The Heat couldn’t put the right team together. That’s absolutely not true.

I’m not having a press conference or a party. After this, it’s time to get to work.

When I left Cleveland, I was on a mission. I was seeking championships, and we won two. But Miami already knew that feeling. Our city hasn’t had that feeling in a long, long, long time. My goal is still to win as many titles as possible, no question. But what’s most important for me is bringing one trophy back to Northeast Ohio.

I always believed that I’d return to Cleveland and finish my career there. I just didn’t know when. After the season, free agency wasn’t even a thought. But I have two boys and my wife, Savannah, is pregnant with a girl. I started thinking about what it would be like to raise my family in my hometown. I looked at other teams, but I wasn’t going to leave Miami for anywhere except Cleveland. The more time passed, the more it felt right. This is what makes me happy.

To make the move I needed the support of my wife and my mom, who can be very tough. The letter from Dan Gilbert, the booing of the Cleveland fans, the jerseys being burned -- seeing all that was hard for them. My emotions were more mixed. It was easy to say, “OK, I don’t want to deal with these people ever again.” But then you think about the other side. What if I were a kid who looked up to an athlete, and that athlete made me want to do better in my own life, and then he left? How would I react? I’ve met with Dan, face-to-face, man-to-man. We’ve talked it out. Everybody makes mistakes. I’ve made mistakes as well. Who am I to hold a grudge?

I’m not promising a championship. I know how hard that is to deliver. We’re not ready right now. No way. Of course, I want to win next year, but I’m realistic. It will be a long process, much longer than it was in 2010. My patience will get tested. I know that. I’m going into a situation with a young team and a new coach. I will be the old head. But I get a thrill out of bringing a group together and helping them reach a place they didn’t know they could go. I see myself as a mentor now and I’m excited to lead some of these talented young guys. I think I can help Kyrie Irving become one of the best point guards in our league. I think I can help elevate Tristan Thompson and Dion Waiters. And I can’t wait to reunite with Anderson Varejao, one of my favorite teammates.

But this is not about the roster or the organization. I feel my calling here goes above basketball. I have a responsibility to lead, in more ways than one, and I take that very seriously. My presence can make a difference in Miami, but I think it can mean more where I’m from. I want kids in Northeast Ohio, like the hundreds of Akron third-graders I sponsor through my foundation, to realize that there’s no better place to grow up. Maybe some of them will come home after college and start a family or open a business. That would make me smile. Our community, which has struggled so much, needs all the talent it can get.

In Northeast Ohio, nothing is given. Everything is earned. You work for what you have.

I’m ready to accept the challenge. I’m coming home.

Pure class right there...a true sign the man has definitely grown up. All the best to him.

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I really want to know what was said in that meeting with the Cavs. Talking heads said it was personal as hell but apparently they worked it out. LeBron is a better man than me because I wouldn't go back. If I did go back I'm coming for the throne (aka significant ownership) when I hang em up and some super Saiyan level groveling from Gilbert on top of it.

I'm happy for LeBron though. For what it's worth his wife put this in the air weeks ago, and happy wife equals happy life. He is also changing the narrative by becoming the mentor, IN HIS PRIME. LeBron is a different dude on so many levels.

If no one else gets anything else out of any of this...please get that. Sports to the side, that's one of the realest quips you'll ever read.

Also, for anyone who by chance hasn't read the letter:

Before anyone ever cared where I would play basketball, I was a kid from Northeast Ohio. Its where I walked. Its where I ran. Its where I cried. Its where I bled. It holds a special place in my heart. People there have seen me grow up. I sometimes feel like Im their son. Their passion can be overwhelming. But it drives me. I want to give them hope when I can. I want to inspire them when I can. My relationship with Northeast Ohio is bigger than basketball. I didnt realize that four years ago. I do now.

Remember when I was sitting up there at the Boys & Girls Club in 2010? I was thinking, This is really tough. I could feel it. I was leaving something I had spent a long time creating. If I had to do it all over again, Id obviously do things differently, but Id still have left. Miami, for me, has been almost like college for other kids. These past four years helped raise me into who I am. I became a better player and a better man. I learned from a franchise that had been where I wanted to go. I will always think of Miami as my second home. Without the experiences I had there, I wouldnt be able to do what Im doing today.

I went to Miami because of D-Wade and CB. We made sacrifices to keep UD. I loved becoming a big bro to Rio. I believed we could do something magical if we came together. And thats exactly what we did! The hardest thing to leave is what I built with those guys. Ive talked to some of them and will talk to others. Nothing will ever change what we accomplished. We are brothers for life. I also want to thank Micky Arison and Pat Riley for giving me an amazing four years.

Im doing this essay because I want an opportunity to explain myself uninterrupted. I dont want anyone thinking: He and Erik Spoelstra didnt get along. He and Riles didnt get along. The Heat couldnt put the right team together. Thats absolutely not true.

Im not having a press conference or a party. After this, its time to get to work.

When I left Cleveland, I was on a mission. I was seeking championships, and we won two. But Miami already knew that feeling. Our city hasnt had that feeling in a long, long, long time. My goal is still to win as many titles as possible, no question. But whats most important for me is bringing one trophy back to Northeast Ohio.

I always believed that Id return to Cleveland and finish my career there. I just didnt know when. After the season, free agency wasnt even a thought. But I have two boys and my wife, Savannah, is pregnant with a girl. I started thinking about what it would be like to raise my family in my hometown. I looked at other teams, but I wasnt going to leave Miami for anywhere except Cleveland. The more time passed, the more it felt right. This is what makes me happy.

To make the move I needed the support of my wife and my mom, who can be very tough. The letter from Dan Gilbert, the booing of the Cleveland fans, the jerseys being burned -- seeing all that was hard for them. My emotions were more mixed. It was easy to say, OK, I dont want to deal with these people ever again. But then you think about the other side. What if I were a kid who looked up to an athlete, and that athlete made me want to do better in my own life, and then he left? How would I react? Ive met with Dan, face-to-face, man-to-man. Weve talked it out. Everybody makes mistakes. Ive made mistakes as well. Who am I to hold a grudge?

Im not promising a championship. I know how hard that is to deliver. Were not ready right now. No way. Of course, I want to win next year, but Im realistic. It will be a long process, much longer than it was in 2010. My patience will get tested. I know that. Im going into a situation with a young team and a new coach. I will be the old head. But I get a thrill out of bringing a group together and helping them reach a place they didnt know they could go. I see myself as a mentor now and Im excited to lead some of these talented young guys. I think I can help Kyrie Irving become one of the best point guards in our league. I think I can help elevate Tristan Thompson and Dion Waiters. And I cant wait to reunite with Anderson Varejao, one of my favorite teammates.

But this is not about the roster or the organization. I feel my calling here goes above basketball. I have a responsibility to lead, in more ways than one, and I take that very seriously. My presence can make a difference in Miami, but I think it can mean more where Im from. I want kids in Northeast Ohio, like the hundreds of Akron third-graders I sponsor through my foundation, to realize that theres no better place to grow up. Maybe some of them will come home after college and start a family or open a business. That would make me smile. Our community, which has struggled so much, needs all the talent it can get.

In Northeast Ohio, nothing is given. Everything is earned. You work for what you have.

Im ready to accept the challenge. Im coming home.

Pure class right there...a true sign the man has definitely grown up. All the best to him.This guy gets it. Probably the realest thing to come from all of this. Yeah Bron missed home, but he even said in his letter that moms and wifey weren't happy with CLE fans/Gilbert for awhile. Once they got on board though...well here we are.

I still don't know if I could play for this guy though:

https://twitter.com/cavsdan/status/487642613613219842

I wouldn't let my child wear a Hernandez jersey, but LeBron? C'mon Dan. This bothers me more than it should.

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Why can't the NHL get a player that the media would go to this extreme for coverage of a potential signing?

They've had two: Gretzky and Lemeiux. But neither were ever in the kind of position James was during their careers due to NHL free agency rules.

Now if he can bring the Cavs a championship. A fitting end to his legacy.

If he can bring the Cavs a championship, it'll be a fitting end to Planet Earth as we know it.

Pure class right there...a true sign the man has definitely grown up hired much better PR people than last time. All the best to him.

FTFY.

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Also, for anyone who by chance hasn't read the letter:

Before anyone ever cared where I would play basketball, I was a kid from Northeast Ohio. It’s where I walked. It’s where I ran. It’s where I cried. It’s where I bled. It holds a special place in my heart. People there have seen me grow up. I sometimes feel like I’m their son. Their passion can be overwhelming. But it drives me. I want to give them hope when I can. I want to inspire them when I can. My relationship with Northeast Ohio is bigger than basketball. I didn’t realize that four years ago. I do now.

Remember when I was sitting up there at the Boys & Girls Club in 2010? I was thinking, This is really tough. I could feel it. I was leaving something I had spent a long time creating. If I had to do it all over again, I’d obviously do things differently, but I’d still have left. Miami, for me, has been almost like college for other kids. These past four years helped raise me into who I am. I became a better player and a better man. I learned from a franchise that had been where I wanted to go. I will always think of Miami as my second home. Without the experiences I had there, I wouldn’t be able to do what I’m doing today.

I went to Miami because of D-Wade and CB. We made sacrifices to keep UD. I loved becoming a big bro to Rio. I believed we could do something magical if we came together. And that’s exactly what we did! The hardest thing to leave is what I built with those guys. I’ve talked to some of them and will talk to others. Nothing will ever change what we accomplished. We are brothers for life. I also want to thank Micky Arison and Pat Riley for giving me an amazing four years.

I’m doing this essay because I want an opportunity to explain myself uninterrupted. I don’t want anyone thinking: He and Erik Spoelstra didn’t get along. … He and Riles didn’t get along. …The Heat couldn’t put the right team together. That’s absolutely not true.

I’m not having a press conference or a party. After this, it’s time to get to work.

When I left Cleveland, I was on a mission. I was seeking championships, and we won two. But Miami already knew that feeling. Our city hasn’t had that feeling in a long, long, long time. My goal is still to win as many titles as possible, no question. But what’s most important for me is bringing one trophy back to Northeast Ohio.

I always believed that I’d return to Cleveland and finish my career there. I just didn’t know when. After the season, free agency wasn’t even a thought. But I have two boys and my wife, Savannah, is pregnant with a girl. I started thinking about what it would be like to raise my family in my hometown. I looked at other teams, but I wasn’t going to leave Miami for anywhere except Cleveland. The more time passed, the more it felt right. This is what makes me happy.

To make the move I needed the support of my wife and my mom, who can be very tough. The letter from Dan Gilbert, the booing of the Cleveland fans, the jerseys being burned -- seeing all that was hard for them. My emotions were more mixed. It was easy to say, “OK, I don’t want to deal with these people ever again.” But then you think about the other side. What if I were a kid who looked up to an athlete, and that athlete made me want to do better in my own life, and then he left? How would I react? I’ve met with Dan, face-to-face, man-to-man. We’ve talked it out. Everybody makes mistakes. I’ve made mistakes as well. Who am I to hold a grudge?

I’m not promising a championship. I know how hard that is to deliver. We’re not ready right now. No way. Of course, I want to win next year, but I’m realistic. It will be a long process, much longer than it was in 2010. My patience will get tested. I know that. I’m going into a situation with a young team and a new coach. I will be the old head. But I get a thrill out of bringing a group together and helping them reach a place they didn’t know they could go. I see myself as a mentor now and I’m excited to lead some of these talented young guys. I think I can help Kyrie Irving become one of the best point guards in our league. I think I can help elevate Tristan Thompson and Dion Waiters. And I can’t wait to reunite with Anderson Varejao, one of my favorite teammates.

But this is not about the roster or the organization. I feel my calling here goes above basketball. I have a responsibility to lead, in more ways than one, and I take that very seriously. My presence can make a difference in Miami, but I think it can mean more where I’m from. I want kids in Northeast Ohio, like the hundreds of Akron third-graders I sponsor through my foundation, to realize that there’s no better place to grow up. Maybe some of them will come home after college and start a family or open a business. That would make me smile. Our community, which has struggled so much, needs all the talent it can get.

In Northeast Ohio, nothing is given. Everything is earned. You work for what you have.

I’m ready to accept the challenge. I’m coming home.

Pure class right there...a true sign the man has definitely grown up. All the best to him.

Agreed. The perfect way to do this.

Good luck to the Cavs.

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There's really nothing special about the letter, it's just empty and pandering. PR 101. It sort of comes off like how some kid would go back into a classroom and gingerly apologize to the teacher in front of everyone after being kicked out for misbehaving and getting screamed at by the vice principal.

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