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NY Knicks Concept (Logo and Uniforms)


Funkatron101

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Like many people, I find the Knicks logo to be a bit outdated, and bland. So I thought I would take a shot at a new logo design.

The concept behind the rebranding is "Embracing the City."

To me, the Knicks have always a huge part of the culture behind NYC. Knicks = NYC. The Knicks brand, however has never really taken on a theme, unless you count the weird Knickerbocker guy.

The two-toned wordmark invokes the urban feel, while the basketball with city silhouette further establishes that they are a part of each other.

The secondary logo takes the popular subway token and merges it with the Apple logo from the 78/79 season.

knicks-final2.jpg

For the uniforms, I wanted to go for a modern, yet classic design. So many people love the throwbacks, that I decided not to deviate too much from them. I also added an orange alternate. The one major difference is the "Knicks" wordmark makes a return for the home and alt jerseys.

knicks-jersey.jpg

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I love it. The style would fit the NBA very well, and it definitely has the feeling of bringing the idea of the city into the logo. The change to a less saturated orange might not be taken well by many Knicks supporters, but I think it works extremely well with what you have here, man. Seriously, good job.

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Did you try pinstriping the other two uniforms?

I did, but as I mentioned, I didn't want to deviate too much from the throwbacks and felt that if I am going to add pinstripes, might as well leave it to an orange alternate that incorporates the two-toned orange. Many Knicks fans can't accept a hue change to their orange and blue, let alone pinstriping, lol.

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Not sure that you can trademark a skyline inside a basketball, or that a logo without any kind of team-specific identifier would fly in the modern age of sports branding.

Other than that this is pretty strong. I think that the two-toned versions would work well in some but not all applications. I'd make separate versions that use solid orange and no skyline. The skyline ones can be used for promotional material and possibly the center court logo, but I'd go with a single color for the primary logos and uniforms. Much easier to reproduce and probably better at scaling as well.

Really liking the home wordmark on the uniforms. I'd try to make the road look a little closer.

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I love these. They are simple yet smart, classy and fit NYC perfectly. Yet I do miss the triangle , if there is a way to incorporate the background triangle is some way these would be perfect. Also the orange might not be the best shade but thats a small tweak.

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i love everything about this, except the choice of colors. i'd say the blue is too green and the orange is too yellow. go with a more traditional knicks color scheme, and these logos would be absolutely perfect.

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I'm seeing it as gold and teal. I really like all three logos, especially the NYK apple. The colours I can't say I'm a fan of. If you used their current blue and orange, and added a second orange, I think it'd work better.

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Yeah i agree with everyone else about the color. you SHOULD tweak the original colors slightly, but not too much like you've done here. The one thing kinda bothering me right now is the darker color used on the top half of the wordmark. I think it would work better if maybe you used it on the bottom half insteak and/or used it to make the letters 3d and add some depth by coloring the very bottom, if that makes sense...?

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Not sure that you can trademark a skyline inside a basketball, or that a logo without any kind of team-specific identifier would fly in the modern age of sports branding.

Other than that this is pretty strong. I think that the two-toned versions would work well in some but not all applications. I'd make separate versions that use solid orange and no skyline. The skyline ones can be used for promotional material and possibly the center court logo, but I'd go with a single color for the primary logos and uniforms. Much easier to reproduce and probably better at scaling as well.

Really liking the home wordmark on the uniforms. I'd try to make the road look a little closer.

What about the Mets?

http://www.sportslogos.net/logo.php?id=m01gfgeorgvbfw15fy04alujm

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Not sure that you can trademark a skyline inside a basketball, or that a logo without any kind of team-specific identifier would fly in the modern age of sports branding.

Other than that this is pretty strong. I think that the two-toned versions would work well in some but not all applications. I'd make separate versions that use solid orange and no skyline. The skyline ones can be used for promotional material and possibly the center court logo, but I'd go with a single color for the primary logos and uniforms. Much easier to reproduce and probably better at scaling as well.

Really liking the home wordmark on the uniforms. I'd try to make the road look a little closer.

What about the Mets?

http://www.sportslog...vbfw15fy04alujm

Apples and oranges. The Mets logo has an actual Mets wordmark in it. There's no actual team mark in your ball logo. If someone were to put a skyline inside a baseball, they'd probably be OK, but as soon as they put a Mets wordmark on it, then they're counterfeiting and the Mets can take action. Either way, when you're trying to build brand recognition, I'm not sure people walking down the street with skyline basketballs really helps - there really should be some kind of team symbol in there (or reduce it to a tertiary mark for use in very limited applications.)

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