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NCAA won't ban Indian nicknames in regular season


officeglenn

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This might possibly be just opening up another can of worms, but I found it on TSN.ca and thought it was newsworthy:

NCAA won't ban Indian mascots, nicknames

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) - The NCAA banned the use of American Indian mascots by sports teams during its post-season tournaments, but will not prohibit them otherwise.

The NCAA's executive committee decided this week the organization did not have the authority to bar Indian mascots by individual schools, committee chairman Walter Harrison said Friday.

Nicknames or mascots deemed "hostile or abusive" would not be allowed by teams on their uniforms or other clothing beginning with any NCAA tournament after Feb. 1, said Harrison, the University of Hartford's president.

"What each institution decides to do is really its own business" outside NCAA championship events, he said.

At least 18 schools have mascots the NCAA would deem "hostile or abusive," including Florida State's Seminole and Illinois' Illini. The full list of schools was not immediately released.

Not all schools with Indian-related nicknames would be on that list. NCAA officials said some schools using the Warrior nickname do not use Indian symbols and would not be affected.

Vernon Bellecourt, president of the National Coalition on Racism in Sports and Media, was pleased with the post-season ban but wanted even stronger action by the NCAA.

"We would have hoped the NCAA would have provided the moral leadership on this issue, but obviously they've chosen to only go halfway," said Bellecourt, a member of the Anishinabe-Ojibwe Nation in Minnesota.

The NCAA two years ago recommended that schools determine for themselves whether the Indian depictions were offensive.

Among the schools to change nicknames in recent years over such concerns were St. John's (from Redmen to Red Storm) and Marquette (from Warriors to Golden Eagles).

The NCAA plans to ban schools using Indian nicknames from hosting post-season events. Harrison said schools with such mascots that have already been selected as tournament sites would be asked to cover any offensive logos.

Such logos also would be prohibited at post-season games on cheerleader and band uniforms starting in 2008.

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Worst.

Compromise.

Ever.

Have the balls to either say we dont think it's offensive and the names can stay or put your foot down on the whole thing and get rid of them.

*insert head shaking smiley here*

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Should be interesting come time for March Madness in the women's brackets. The host venues aren't announced until the seedings come out, and the best seed usually has home court advantage until the Sweet 16. Should be fun if a team like Illinois has the best record but gets the home court advantage taken away due to its nickname.

I guess you can say goodbye to North Dakota hosting any Frozen Four games as well.

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I guess you can say goodbye to North Dakota hosting any Frozen Four games as well.

That seems easy enough to get around. Just have the WCHA be the "hosts" and use Englestad Arena as the venue.

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Once again, a screaming, very small minority gets their way! You know, some terms like "Redskins", may have meant something awful in our history, but that does not necessarily mean that they do today. Just as an example Liberal, Kansas is a town 13 miles from where I live. Their high school mascot is the Redskins. Their logo is profile head shot much like the Washington Redskins, and some sort of axe in the shape of an "L" to the left and below the profile. THIS MASCOT WAS GIVEN A SEAL OF APPROVAL BY THE NATIVE AMERICAN TRIBES IN KANSAS!!! If they, being the "Redskins" don't have a problem with it, why should anyone else. I also heard of a town in Alaska that could not play in the state tournament because their nickname "Halfbreads" was considered offensive. They named themselves Halfbreads because...THAT'S WHAT THEY WERE, AND HAD NO PROBLEM WITH IT! This is a definition of insanity & stupidity put together! :cursing:

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This is my first post and one topic that cannot hurt me any more. I grew up going to Illinois games and watching their games. I was show the importance of Cheif Illiniwick. I don't want Florida State or Illinois to change their nicknames like Stanford just because Myles Brand wants to be sensetive to upset white anglo-saxons. Native Americans have given the blessing to the University of Illinois to use Cheif Illiniwick. Something must be done to save the logos and nicknames of these great institutions. :cry:

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OK. For purposes of accurate discussion, I will post the complete NCAA announcement on the subject. The news stories don't begin to show the idiocy and hypocracy that the NCAA's own words display:

For Immediate Release

Friday, August 5 , 2005 Contact

Bob Williams

Managing Director of Public and Media Relations

317/917-6117

INDIANAPOLIS --- The presidents and chancellors who serve on the NCAA Executive Committee have adopted a new policy to prohibit NCAA colleges and universities from displaying hostile and abusive racial/ethnic/national origin mascots, nicknames or imagery at any of the 88 NCAA championships.

The Executive Committee, meeting Thursday in Indianapolis, also approved recommended best practices for schools who continue to use Native American mascots, nicknames and imagery in their intercollegiate athletic programs.

"Colleges and universities may adopt any mascot that they wish, as that is an institutional matter," said Walter Harrison, chair of the Executive Committee and president at the University of Hartford. "But as a national association, we believe that mascots, nicknames or images deemed hostile or abusive in terms of race, ethnicity or national origin should not be visible at the championship events that we control."

The policy prohibiting colleges or universities with hostile or abusive mascots, nicknames or imagery from hosting any NCAA championship competitions takes effect February 1, 2006.

"The NCAA objects to institutions using racial/ethnic/national origin references in their intercollegiate athletics programs," said NCAA President Myles Brand. "Several institutions have made changes that adhere to the core values of the NCAA Constitution pertaining to cultural diversity, ethical sportsmanship and nondiscrimination. We applaud that, and we will continue to monitor these institutions and others. All institutions are encouraged to promote these core values and take proactive steps at every NCAA event through institutional event management to enhance the integrity of intercollegiate athletics related to these issues."

Other elements of the policy approved Thursday require that institutions with hostile or abusive references must take reasonable steps to cover up those references at any predetermined NCAA championship site that has been previously awarded, effective February 1, 2006.

Institutions displaying or promoting hostile or abusive references on their mascots, cheerleaders, dance teams and band uniforms or paraphernalia are prohibited from wearing the material at NCAA championships, effective August 1, 2008.

Last, and effective immediately, institutions with student-athletes wearing uniforms or having paraphernalia with hostile or abusive references must ensure that those uniforms or paraphernalia not be worn or displayed at NCAA championship competitions.

Harrison stressed that institutions affected by the new policy can seek further review of the matter through the NCAA governing structure.

The committee also strongly suggested that institutions follow the best practices of institutions that do not support the use of Native American mascots or imagery. Model institutions include the University of Iowa and University of Wisconsin, who have practices of not scheduling athletic competitions with schools who use Native American nicknames, imagery or mascots.

Additionally, the committee suggested that institutions should review their publications and written materials for hostile and abusive references and remove those depictions, which is the current policy of the NCAA National Office.

Last, member institutions are encouraged to educate their internal and external constituents on the understanding and awareness of the negative impact of hostile or abusive symbols, names and imagery, and to create a greater level of knowledge of Native American culture through outreach efforts and other means of communication.

The recommendations stemmed from discussions in June at the NCAA Minority Opportunities and Interest Committee (MOIC) meeting in Boston. Those recommendations were forwarded to the Executive Committee Subcommittee on Gender and Diversity Issues earlier this week. The subcommittee then forwarded its recommended changes to the Executive Committee, which is the highest ranking committee in the NCAA governance structure.

Three events prompted initial discussion on mascots within the Association in April 2001?membership feedback; ongoing issues surrounding the Confederate Battle Flag; and the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights? statement on the use of American Indian imagery as sports symbols.

In November 2004, 33 schools were asked to submit self evaluations to the NCAA National Office to determine the extent, if any, of the use of Native American imagery or references on their campuses. Specific aspects of the self evaluations centered on three NCAA Constitution principles that reference cultural diversity and gender equity (Article 2.2.2); the principle of sportsmanship and ethical conduct (Article 2.4); and the principle of nondiscrimination (Article 2.6).

Eighteen colleges and universities continue to use Native American imagery or references and are subject to the new policy:

? Alcorn State University (Braves)

? Central Michigan University (Chippewas)

? Catawba College (Indians)

? Florida State University (Seminoles)

? Midwestern State University (Indians)

? University of Utah (Utes)

? Indiana University-Pennsylvania (Indians)

? Carthage College (Redmen)

? Bradley University (Braves)

? Arkansas State University (Indians)

? Chowan College (Braves)

? University of Illinois-Champaign (Illini)

? University of Louisiana-Monroe (Indians)

? McMurry University (Indians)

? Mississippi College (Choctaws)

? Newberry College (Indians)

? University of North Dakota (Fighting Sioux)

? Southeastern Oklahoma State University (Savages)

Fourteen schools have removed all references to Native American culture or were deemed not to have references to Native American culture as part of their athletics programs: California State-Stanislaus University; Lycoming College; Winona State University; Hawaii-Manoa University; Eastern Connecticut State University; East Stroudsburg University; Husson College; Merrimack College; Southeast Missouri State University; State University of West Georgia; Stonehill College; San Diego State University; Wisconsin Lutheran College; and the University of North Carolina-Pembroke.

The College of William and Mary has been given an extension to complete its self-study on the mascot issue.

In other action from the Executive Committee, members updated the Association?s alcohol policy, recommending that member colleges and universities review a number of suggested actions.

"As college presidents, we are very concerned about the use of alcohol on our campuses and the abuse of it by our students and in society at large," Harrison said.

The suggestions include prohibiting the sale of alcohol during all college sports events (preseason, regular season, conference and postseason); encouraging fans to drink responsibly and legally outside stadiums or arenas; and prohibiting onsite alcohol advertising during all college sports events, taking into account contractual issues already in place with advertisers.

The revised policy also suggests prohibiting media advertising of alcohol that exceeds six percent of alcohol by volume; and limiting advertising of malt beverages, beer and wine products. Such ads should not comprise more than 60 seconds per broadcast hour, two minutes during any game telecast and no more than 14 percent of a game program or publication, and they should include tag lines such as "Drink Responsibly" and "Be Legal."

Furthermore, the alcohol policy calls for NCAA colleges and universities to provide programs and resources for education, prevention and treatment of alcohol abuse.

The NCAA has for years banned sales and advertising of all alcohol at its 88 championships. The association also limits broadcast advertising during championships to not more than 60 seconds per broadcast hour and two minutes in any championship telecast or broadcast. Many of the alcohol ads contain language stressing the legal and responsible use of alcohol.

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Well, now that we've seen the statement, let's look at some bits of it:

Walter Harrison, chair of the Executive Committee: "... We believe that mascots, nicknames or images deemed hostile or abusive in terms of race, ethnicity or national origin should not be visible at the championship events that we control."

Myles Brand, NCAA president: "The NCAA objects to institutions using racial/ethnic/national origin references in their intercollegiate athletics programs."

So why isn't Notre Dame on the list? "Fighting" is certainly a hostile term, and "Irish" is clearly a term of ethnicity and national origin.

Maybe it's all the green in South Bend that makes the difference. And I don't mean the shamrock logos!

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This is my first post and one topic that cannot hurt me any more. I grew up going to Illinois games and watching their games. I was show the importance of Cheif Illiniwick. I don't want Florida State or Illinois to change their nicknames like Stanford just because Myles Brand wants to be sensetive to upset white anglo-saxons. Native Americans have given the blessing to the University of Illinois to use Cheif Illiniwick. Something must be done to save the logos and nicknames of these great institutions. :cry:

thank you very much,i couldn't agree with you more,that's the key.In fact i said something about this same subject in a different thread a little over a month ago

,but in all seriousness here's a simple solution to all this BS,just get the powers that be of a research or focus group to go up to a specific tribe, show them the university's identity package (logos wordmark mascot,etc,) and ask them the simple question "are you offended by this" it so simple even a caveman can do it (pun intended)
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Should be interesting come time for March Madness in the women's brackets. The host venues aren't announced until the seedings come out, and the best seed usually has home court advantage until the Sweet 16. Should be fun if a team like Illinois has the best record but gets the home court advantage taken away due to its nickname.

I guess you can say goodbye to North Dakota hosting any Frozen Four games as well.

That is no longer the case. The NCAA went to the same eight pre-determined site structure that the men's tournament uses. In fact, they just released first and second round sites for the next three seasons. These can be found at http://www.ncaasports.com/basketball/womens/schedules

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First off, hooray to Des Moines for landing first and second round games in the Women's tourny.

Now, back to the topic at hand. It's retarded as hell, man. I'm not offended by these nicknames. It sounds like a case of the NCAA (Namely Miles Brand) whining and moaning to get his way and force schools, which have had done with these nicknames for so long, to change.

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Speaking as an alum of the University of North Dakota, this has ramifications for UND beyond whether they an host a Frozen Four.

The Sioux every year boast a strong enough hockey program to make it to the Frozen Four. So will they now have to change their jerseys for those appearances? Look at their sweaters: they have a big American Indian head emblazoned across the chest.

Unless I'm reading this wrong, this could lead to some universities -- at least those with the chance of making it to a national title game -- making immediate uniform changes.

I've never minded the Fighting Sioux nickname, but I've had a lot of exposure to folks who do and I've always respected their arguments. It's not up to me to determine what offends someone and it's not my place to judge.

But I really don't like this ruling, largely because it only addresses the issue in piecemeal. In other words, you can keep your nicknames and logos but not if youre athletic teams are successful.

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Without dipping my toes too far into this, one thing caught my eye looking at the list of schools.

UNC-Pembroke's nickname is the Braves. Apparently, the NCAA was satisfied that they had removed all Native American imagery from their athletics program. The problem is, UNCP was founded by Native Americans for Native Americans. Their campus is in the middle of the lands of the Lumbee Indian tribe, and the school is overwhelmingly populated by Native Americans. And THEY can't have Indian imagery? Is anyone paying attention?

From the UNCP Web site:

"The school opened with 15 students and one teacher in the fall of 1887. The normal school was founded to train Native American public school teachers. For many years, the instruction was at the elementary and secondary level, and the first diploma was awarded in 1905.

The school moved to its present location in Pembroke, the center of the Indian community, in 1909. The General Assembly changed the name of the institution in 1911 to the Indian Normal School of Robeson County, and again in 1913 to the Cherokee Indian Normal School of Robeson County. In 1926, the Board of Trustees added a two-year normal program beyond high school, and phased out elementary instruction. The first 10 diplomas were awarded in 1928, when the state accredited the school as a "standard normal school."

Additional college classes were offered beginning in 1931, and in 1939 a fourth year was added with the first degrees conferred in 1940. In recognition of its new status, the General Assembly changed the name of the school in 1941 to Pembroke State College for Indians. Until 1953 it was the only state-supported four-year college for Indians in the nation. The scope of the institution was widened in1942 when non-teaching baccalaureate degrees were added, and in 1945 when enrollment, previously limited to the Indians of Robeson County, was opened to people from all federally-recognized Indian groups. A few years later, in 1949, the General Assembly shortened the name to Pembroke State College."

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Without dipping my toes too far into this, one thing caught my eye looking at the list of schools.

UNC-Pembroke's nickname is the Braves. Apparently, the NCAA was satisfied that they had removed all Native American imagery from their athletics program. The problem is, UNCP was founded by Native Americans for Native Americans. Their campus is in the middle of the lands of the Lumbee Indian tribe, and the school is overwhelmingly populated by Native Americans. And THEY can't have Indian imagery? Is anyone paying attention?

From espn.com

North Carolina-Pembroke, which uses the nickname Braves, will not face sanctions. NCAA president Myles Brand explained said the school's student body has historically admitted a high percentage of American Indians and more than 20 percent of the students are American Indians.

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Ok yeah, I can understand if the Indian names were used just because they liked Indian

nicknames, but some of these colleges actually have a Native American history behind their nicknames. I agree, I think they just found names and put them on that list without

doing a backup check or anything. <_<

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Is something like "Fighting Sioux" really a problem? Or "Fighting anything," for that matter. What would you rather have? One of those....or something like ":censored:-ass Push-overs" or "Crying Mama's Boys"?

I take the "Fighting" portion of the names to indicate a fearless, strong, and brave group of people. I don't take it as indicating excessive aggression or ruthless violence.

Now, I can see "Savages" or "Redmen" being banned because they are basically inaccurate descriptions of a group of people, but this is just getting stupid. <_<

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