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Division 1 College Conference Realignment


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Dan Wetzel from Monday.

Big 12 commissioner Dan Beebe all but killed his own conference on April 30, 2008.

That?s when he decided to team up with the Big Ten and Pac-10 to reject a four-team playoff being pushed by the SEC and ACC. If the Big 12 (and/or the Big East) had supported it, the so-called ?Plus One? model likely would?ve happened.

Even that modest playoff would have meant hundreds of millions of additional revenue for college athletics. It would have then allowed for easy expansion for an even more lucrative 16-team postseason. That would have solved all the monetary concerns that have left the Big 12 on the verge of collapse at the hands of its one-time allies, the Big Ten and Pac-10.

Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany admitted to Congress a 16-team playoff could gross four times what the current Bowl Championship Series does ? in other words about $900 million annually.

He opposed it anyway. Beebe and the others never seemed to ask why. They?re finding out now.

It?s clear now that Delany used opposition to a football playoff not to preserve some bit of ?tradition.? His expansion plans clearly indicate he cares nothing about that. It certainly wasn?t done for the sake of aiding Big Ten football, since a playoff with on-campus home games likely would?ve helped his teams.

The goal was to starve out the Big 12, Big East and even the ACC of the hundreds of millions a playoff would?ve given them and thus turn the future of college sports into a battle of television sets.

Delany couldn?t assure that the Big Ten would?ve done well in a football playoff. Maybe the league would?ve succeeded, maybe not. With 26 percent of the nation?s population, tradition rich clubs and its own cable network though, the Big Ten will always dominate if everything boils down to TV revenue.

It was a genius, cut-throat play. He set the terms of the game so he?d win. The Pac-10, led by aggressive new commissioner Larry Scott, is taking advantage also. I?m not blaming Delany here. I may not believe a 16-team Big Ten (or Pac-10) is in the best interest of the league?s current members (or the NCAA as a whole), but it?s not that big of a deal to me. Whatever happens, happens. Besides, it?s not Delany?s fault he?s smarter than the other guys.

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How come they want to change all of these conferences? Why not keep them the same and just add a playoff? I don't know about any of you but I'm not a fan of all this.

Money. It isn't about getting a playoff (although that might result), it is about conferences expanding their tv footprints. Specifically the Big Ten that has its own channel and the Pac-10 that wants to start its own channel.

Right now as a Maryland fan I'm hoping Texas does indeed go to the Pac-10 and the Big 10 expands beyond 14 teams. In that case in looks like Maryland will probably be one of the new Big 10 teams. As it seems the madhouse scenario is going down you do not want to be stuck in what will end up becoming the ACC/Big East leftover conference. That would be a terrible conference. The Big Ten would be a good fit. I just don't want the Terps to end up being left behind.

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So, I been thinking about this whole, Super/Mega Conference expansion, and since I am in Big 10 country... I was thinking about 5 key school that would help the the Big 10 as much as possible. Here is what I came up with:

ExpandedMapcopy.png?t=1276295489

Ignore the 12... I'm not sure why it's on there.

Anyway... So... rumors came out that the Big 10 wanted to have a 2 League, 4 division, Conference. There were rumors of adding 5 of the following teams: Nebraska, Mizzou, Syracuse, Rutgers, Notre Dame, Georgia Tech, Vanderbilt, Maryland, and Pitt.

Now, main main objective was to NOT add a school that was in a state that ALREADY had a school in that state, except for ND. The reason is this. One report stated that the Big 10 gets 70% of the profits earned from states that have a school in the conference. For viewers OUTSIDE of a state that has a school, the Big 10 only gets 30% profit.

Now, where I deviated was West Virginia and Syracuse. Here is why. West Virginia add another state market, as mentioned above. WV also brings in the back yard rivalry with Pitt, as well as Virgina Tech.

Syracuse was chosen to bring in the New York state market, which is being craved by the Big 10. Now, I chose the Orange for 2 reasons. The first is the market. Second, it couples up with the addition of West Virginia. It now brings 2, established basketball schools to join Purdue, Ohio State, Michigan State, Wisconsin, and Illinois.

I think this is an important factor because it gets away from the football ONLY idea, and makes the Big 10 legitimate in football and basketball, while still bringing it potentially massive amount of revenue.

Now... The Big 10 said they wanted to add a championship game, and I think its a great idea... they need it. But my idea is extended to a 2 game playoff. As you can see, I separated the 16 schools into 4 divisions, based on location. I tried to separate major rivalries for the following reason: it enables a Big Midwest Championship between Michigan and Ohio State.

Now people are going to say OMG YOU CANT SEPARATE THOSE TEAMS! bla bla bla. Here is how it will work. I am estimating a 12 game regular season with a 2 game playoff. I will refer to Ohio State for the remainder of the scenario.

As part of the 12 games, Ohio State will play the 3 teams in its division. Total: 3 games.

Every 3 years, the Divisions will cycle each other. So the melting pot will play 4 teams from the Breadbasket 1 year, then the 4 teams from the Great Lakes the next year, and the 4 teams from the Heartland in the 3rd year. Total: 7 games.

Now, it seems there will be 3 "tune up" games to start the year... i.e. Akron, Toledo, Ohio U. Total: 10 games.

This leave 2 games. My idea is, the years Ohio State DOES NOT play Michigan, they use 1 of the 2 remaining games to schedule Michigan. The last game (or both) if the school chooses to, is to schedule out of conference power house games, like USC, Miami, Florida. whatever. Total: 12 games.

Now... for the play off. It will take the winning team from each Division. They can either be ranks overall 1-4 and 1 plays 4 and 2 plays 3... or, it can simply be the Winner from Heartland West plays the winner of Breadbasket West. Then the winner of Great Lakes East plays the winner of Melting Pot East. The winners play each other.

It is just something I have been thinking about. Yes, it leads to a potentially 15 game season, but I think it adds 2 extra games of revenue, also adds conditioning for the NFL. If the regular season ends on a saturday, there would be a week off, then the following saturday would be the first play off game. Another week layoff, then the following saturday would be the championship.

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So, I been thinking about this whole, Super/Mega Conference expansion, and since I am in Big 10 country... I was thinking about 5 key school that would help the the Big 10 as much as possible. Here is what I came up with:

ExpandedMapcopy.png?t=1276295489

Ignore the 12... I'm not sure why it's on there.

Anyway... So... rumors came out that the Big 10 wanted to have a 2 League, 4 division, Conference. There were rumors of adding 5 of the following teams: Nebraska, Mizzou, Syracuse, Rutgers, Notre Dame, Georgia Tech, Vanderbilt, Maryland, and Pitt.

Now, main main objective was to NOT add a school that was in a state that ALREADY had a school in that state, except for ND. The reason is this. One report stated that the Big 10 gets 70% of the profits earned from states that have a school in the conference. For viewers OUTSIDE of a state that has a school, the Big 10 only gets 30% profit.

Now, where I deviated was West Virginia and Syracuse. Here is why. West Virginia add another state market, as mentioned above. WV also brings in the back yard rivalry with Pitt, as well as Virgina Tech.

The Big Ten will not add West Virginia for the reasons you mentioned about wanting new markets in the Big Ten. West Virginia doesn't bring any new big markets into the equation, they aren't going to get the B10 network in very many additional new homes. Plus they aren't like a historic program like Nebraska that can get away with that. On top of that West Virginia isn't strong academically. Remember the people making the final decisions aren't the sports people but the academic presidents. Now that the Pac-10 has sold out their academics for their big move the Big Ten more than any other conference cares the most about a schools academic standing. Now the Big Ten if enough money was out their would sell their academic soul, but in this case they don't as the most attractive candidates from a market point a view (Syracuse, Rutgers, Maryland, Georgia Tech, Missouri, ect.) also fit the Big Ten's academic profile.

I ultimately think in order the invitees to the Big Ten will be Rutgers, Notre Dame (those two probably at the same time), Maryland, then either Syracuse or Missouri.

-Rutgers gets the next invite to expand the footprint and to try to force ND. While I don't know how many NYC eyeballs Rutgers will attract, it does make NJ a footprint state. That means the Big Ten can charge NJ cable operators more for the Big Ten network.

-Notre Dame "gets the next invite", but I think they turn it down at this point in hopes of holding onto academics. I don't think losing Rutgers blows up the Big East (especially with the Big 12 north teams still out there). As such ND rejects here and the Big Ten moves on to try to force.

-Maryland gets the next invite. Maryland gives you again footprint. The school provides you access to the Baltimore and DC markets, which combined is good enough to be the 4th largest market in the country. Question here is if those in charge of Maryland want to jump off the titanic or not.

-Next non-ND invite would go to either Missouri or Syracuse. It will depend on if the Big Ten feels they need to force ND more or not. Also if they feel they need to go more into NY state to get the NYC market. If so on both it will be Syracuse. If not maybe Missouri although I think they ran their mouths out of a Big Ten invite.

-Notre Dame probably relents for 16.

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So, I been thinking about this whole, Super/Mega Conference expansion, and since I am in Big 10 country... I was thinking about 5 key school that would help the the Big 10 as much as possible. Here is what I came up with:

Ignore the 12... I'm not sure why it's on there.

Anyway... So... rumors came out that the Big 10 wanted to have a 2 League, 4 division, Conference. There were rumors of adding 5 of the following teams: Nebraska, Mizzou, Syracuse, Rutgers, Notre Dame, Georgia Tech, Vanderbilt, Maryland, and Pitt.

Now, main main objective was to NOT add a school that was in a state that ALREADY had a school in that state, except for ND. The reason is this. One report stated that the Big 10 gets 70% of the profits earned from states that have a school in the conference. For viewers OUTSIDE of a state that has a school, the Big 10 only gets 30% profit.

Now, where I deviated was West Virginia and Syracuse. Here is why. West Virginia add another state market, as mentioned above. WV also brings in the back yard rivalry with Pitt, as well as Virgina Tech.

Syracuse was chosen to bring in the New York state market, which is being craved by the Big 10. Now, I chose the Orange for 2 reasons. The first is the market. Second, it couples up with the addition of West Virginia. It now brings 2, established basketball schools to join Purdue, Ohio State, Michigan State, Wisconsin, and Illinois.

I think this is an important factor because it gets away from the football ONLY idea, and makes the Big 10 legitimate in football and basketball, while still bringing it potentially massive amount of revenue.

Now... The Big 10 said they wanted to add a championship game, and I think its a great idea... they need it. But my idea is extended to a 2 game playoff. As you can see, I separated the 16 schools into 4 divisions, based on location. I tried to separate major rivalries for the following reason: it enables a Big Midwest Championship between Michigan and Ohio State.

Now people are going to say OMG YOU CANT SEPARATE THOSE TEAMS! bla bla bla. Here is how it will work. I am estimating a 12 game regular season with a 2 game playoff. I will refer to Ohio State for the remainder of the scenario.

As part of the 12 games, Ohio State will play the 3 teams in its division. Total: 3 games.

Every 3 years, the Divisions will cycle each other. So the melting pot will play 4 teams from the Breadbasket 1 year, then the 4 teams from the Great Lakes the next year, and the 4 teams from the Heartland in the 3rd year. Total: 7 games.

Now, it seems there will be 3 "tune up" games to start the year... i.e. Akron, Toledo, Ohio U. Total: 10 games.

This leave 2 games. My idea is, the years Ohio State DOES NOT play Michigan, they use 1 of the 2 remaining games to schedule Michigan. The last game (or both) if the school chooses to, is to schedule out of conference power house games, like USC, Miami, Florida. whatever. Total: 12 games.

Now... for the play off. It will take the winning team from each Division. They can either be ranks overall 1-4 and 1 plays 4 and 2 plays 3... or, it can simply be the Winner from Heartland West plays the winner of Breadbasket West. Then the winner of Great Lakes East plays the winner of Melting Pot East. The winners play each other.

It is just something I have been thinking about. Yes, it leads to a potentially 15 game season, but I think it adds 2 extra games of revenue, also adds conditioning for the NFL. If the regular season ends on a saturday, there would be a week off, then the following saturday would be the first play off game. Another week layoff, then the following saturday would be the championship.

All you did was rehash the scheduling which the 16 team WAC had (and was retold to America via Andy Staples' si.com story in late May).

For a 15 game schedule, NCAA Bylaw 17.11.5 (Number of Contests) as well as when the season can start/end (17.11.4 End of Playing Season) would have to be amended to accomplish that. That is if the Big Ten will still be a NCAA member.

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The Big Ten will not add West Virginia for the reasons you mentioned about wanting new markets in the Big Ten. West Virginia doesn't bring any new big markets into the equation, they aren't going to get the B10 network in very many additional new homes. Plus they aren't like a historic program like Nebraska that can get away with that. On top of that West Virginia isn't strong academically. Remember the people making the final decisions aren't the sports people but the academic presidents. Now that the Pac-10 has sold out their academics for their big move the Big Ten more than any other conference cares the most about a schools academic standing. Now the Big Ten if enough money was out their would sell their academic soul, but in this case they don't as the most attractive candidates from a market point a view (Syracuse, Rutgers, Maryland, Georgia Tech, Missouri, ect.) also fit the Big Ten's academic profile.

I ultimately think in order the invitees to the Big Ten will be Rutgers, Notre Dame (those two probably at the same time), Maryland, then either Syracuse or Missouri.

-Rutgers gets the next invite to expand the footprint and to try to force ND. While I don't know how many NYC eyeballs Rutgers will attract, it does make NJ a footprint state. That means the Big Ten can charge NJ cable operators more for the Big Ten network.

-Notre Dame "gets the next invite", but I think they turn it down at this point in hopes of holding onto academics. I don't think losing Rutgers blows up the Big East (especially with the Big 12 north teams still out there). As such ND rejects here and the Big Ten moves on to try to force.

-Maryland gets the next invite. Maryland gives you again footprint. The school provides you access to the Baltimore and DC markets, which combined is good enough to be the 4th largest market in the country. Question here is if those in charge of Maryland want to jump off the titanic or not.

-Next non-ND invite would go to either Missouri or Syracuse. It will depend on if the Big Ten feels they need to force ND more or not. Also if they feel they need to go more into NY state to get the NYC market. If so on both it will be Syracuse. If not maybe Missouri although I think they ran their mouths out of a Big Ten invite.

-Notre Dame probably relents for 16.

I understand the market aspect of West Virginia, but it adds another state, and it makes the footprint bigger, as well as adding a top 30 football team (for the most part), and a top 25 basketball program.

I would rather The Big 10 add 'Cuse rather than Rutgers because of the basketball aspect. I think the football side is a wash.

I heard Mizzou is dying to get in, but the Big 10 is giving them the cold shoulder because Iowa and Nebraska has basically said they can guarantee the Kansas City and St. Louise markets, which is the only reason the Big 10 wants Mizzou.

Now, the point you made with Maryland is pretty interesting. That, again, is clearly a money move, which I think the Mizzou move can be justified with competitive football and basketball. I had heard a lot of rumors about Maryland being the next target, and with the point you made about Baltimore and DC makes sense why they would target them.

One thing I thought would be interesting that no one talked about was Louisville. Again, you expand the footprint and is smack dab in Big 10 country... you bring in a legit basketball school... and could be poised to build a football team if it is in a more solid conference than the Big East.

To be honest, I think a lot of schools like Maryland, Cuse, Louisville would be interested in joining, and depending how Big the Big 10 really wants to be (since it is media driven based), might be willing to have a 20 school, truly MEGA conference.

I know the Big 10 is also trying to justify the moves by academic standards, which is why Nebraska was a shoe-in, and why Syracuse/Rutgers are also viable. The 3, including Maryland, are all part of the Association of American Uni's. Louisville and WV are not.

I did hear the ND pretty much wants to snub their nose, until the Big 10 gets 15 teams... and basically says... either you are 16, or you are nothing. And if it comes to that, I have heard ND will accept the invite.

The Big 10 is in an interesting spot, because of all the possibilities they have. My problem with the Rutgers move is this: if its going to be a market based moved, bring in Rutgers, but then why not bring in Boston College? Just because they are not AAU, they wouldn't be considered. What about Virginia? could they be justified? It is crazy to think about.

To be honest, after this Big conferences realign... I would be willing to bet the house that a new conference emerges. Some of these schools are not going to be willing to join this lesser conferences.

I just don't see the Big 10 NOT inviting Mizzou. Just because I think they want the 70% revenue instead of just 30%.

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All you did was rehash the scheduling which the 16 team WAC had (and was retold to America via Andy Staples' si.com story in late May).

For a 15 game schedule, NCAA Bylaw 17.11.5 (Number of Contests) as well as when the season can start/end (17.11.4 End of Playing Season) would have to be amended to accomplish that. That is if the Big Ten will still be a NCAA member.

Didn't read the article, but if that is what he had wrote, then great minds think alike. As for the NCAA length of season... If these conferences are going to force the issue, I could see the NCAA changing the ruling. It is no secret that the NCAA would NOT want to lose revenue, so an expansion would be a possibility. If not, the top 2 teams would play, and eliminate the first round of the play offs.

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College football is about to be ruined.

How so?

This move towards mega-conferences. They're going to all but kill the mid-major conferences like The MAC and Mountain West etc. The Big XII is already on life support and it's only a matter of time before The ACC, Big Ten, and SEC finish off what's left of The Big East. That leaves us with 4 "major conferences" and schools like Boise State, Utah, etc. are basically screwed worse than they already are. In short, this is going to create a new division that's somewhere between FBS and FCS. Maybe I'm missing something but I just don't see how any of this is good for the sport as a whole.

College football is about to be ruined.

Perhaps this will be the catalyst for a playoff.

Careful what you wish for. A playoff sounds great until you start thinking about the ramifications it will have on smaller schools. With four "mega-conferences" calling the shots you're all kidding yourselves if you think teams from The MAC or MWC will ever get anywhere near a playoff. An 8 team playoff will mean the top two schools from each mega-conference. With four mega-conferences there won't be any "16 team playoff" with every conference champ getting a slot. My argument last season was that there was no way any playoff was going to include The MAC champion at the expense of a two-loss Texas or Georgia etc. With all this conference jumping going on it's even more certain that the "little guys" will be outside looking in.

Then there's this...With a playoff the big teams will have no reason to play the little guys. Why should Ohio State bring in a team like Kent when they can just as easily schedule a good team and get a real tune-up before conference play? All Ohio State will need to do is go 10-2 maybe even 9-3 and they're in. The risk of an early season loss wouldn't matter so there would be no real reason to let a Kent State come to the Shoe and get a big paycheck. Ohio State vs. Oklahoma in October will make a ton more money for both schools as well as TV. All of a sudden the Kent States of the world are no longer able to score that big check a couple times a year. The end result is that all the mid-majors aren't making any money and football programs get dropped.

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College football is about to be ruined.

How so?

This move towards mega-conferences. They're going to all but kill the mid-major conferences like The MAC and Mountain West etc. The Big XII is already on life support and it's only a matter of time before The ACC, Big Ten, and SEC finish off what's left of The Big East. That leaves us with 4 "major conferences" and schools like Boise State, Utah, etc. are basically screwed worse than they already are. In short, this is going to create a new division that's somewhere between FBS and FCS. Maybe I'm missing something but I just don't see how any of this is good for the sport as a whole.

College football is about to be ruined.

Perhaps this will be the catalyst for a playoff.

Careful what you wish for. A playoff sounds great until you start thinking about the ramifications it will have on smaller schools. With four "mega-conferences" calling the shots you're all kidding yourselves if you think teams from The MAC or MWC will ever get anywhere near a playoff. An 8 team playoff will mean the top two schools from each mega-conference. With four mega-conferences there won't be any "16 team playoff" with every conference champ getting a slot. My argument last season was that there was no way any playoff was going to include The MAC champion at the expense of a two-loss Texas or Georgia etc. With all this conference jumping going on it's even more certain that the "little guys" will be outside looking in.

Then there's this...With a playoff the big teams will have no reason to play the little guys. Why should Ohio State bring in a team like Kent when they can just as easily schedule a good team and get a real tune-up before conference play? All Ohio State will need to do is go 10-2 maybe even 9-3 and they're in. The risk of an early season loss wouldn't matter so there would be no real reason to let a Kent State come to the Shoe and get a big paycheck. Ohio State vs. Oklahoma in October will make a ton more money for both schools as well as TV. All of a sudden the Kent States of the world are no longer able to score that big check a couple times a year. The end result is that all the mid-majors aren't making any money and football programs get dropped.

Like i said, I could see the formation of NEW conferences falling out from this... how competitive or attractive they will be, is yet to be seen.

As for the playoff idea... I think this moves us FARTHER away from it. Because it is limited... I think the BCS will look at it as, SEC had a great year, Big 10 had a great year, the ACC was :censored:, the Big East was OK, the Pac 10 was good. Who won in the those conferences? Alabama, Ohio State, Texas, Cincci? Alabama is in, Cinci is out... so who was rated higher in the pre-season? Texas or OSU? OSU was, OK, OSU/Alabama for the title.

If anything, I think it makes is easier for the BCS to justify the Bowls.

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All you did was rehash the scheduling which the 16 team WAC had (and was retold to America via Andy Staples' si.com story in late May).

For a 15 game schedule, NCAA Bylaw 17.11.5 (Number of Contests) as well as when the season can start/end (17.11.4 End of Playing Season) would have to be amended to accomplish that. That is if the Big Ten will still be a NCAA member.

Didn't read the article, but if that is what he had wrote, then great minds think alike. As for the NCAA length of season... If these conferences are going to force the issue, I could see the NCAA changing the ruling. It is no secret that the NCAA would NOT want to lose revenue, so an expansion would be a possibility. If not, the top 2 teams would play, and eliminate the first round of the play offs.

The current bylaws state that a team cannot start their season until the Thursday before Labor Day and must finish their season by the second weekend in December. Coaches still want their teams to have a BYE week as well. Schools which run on the quarter system may have a early season advantage as classes would be in session.

The NCAA national budget is made up from the following:

90%-TV/Marketing Rights Fees

9%-Championship Ticket Revenues

1%0Investment Fees/Services

The NCAA does not see any money from additional regular season football games, those monies are just split between the schools. The only BCS money they receive comes from the NCAA Postseason Licensing Subcommittee who licenses all postseason bowls and assigns crews from the FBS conferences to officiate the games.

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I think the super conferences do take us toward a step to a college football playoff because it takes us closer to the big schools just pulling out of the NCAA and starting their own governing body. At that point there would be no reason to keep the bowls instead of a playoff because a playoff in this new association the money doesn't have to be split with all the small lower division schools. A playoff would create more money than the bowls.

Now after saying that for the same reason it also takes us towards a really crappy NCAA basketball tournament as there won't be as Cinderella would be dead.

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With a playoff the big teams will have no reason to play the little guys. Why should Ohio State bring in a team like Kent when they can just as easily schedule a good team and get a real tune-up before conference play?

Ohio State has no business pulverizing a little bug like Kent State anyway. That's like the Yankees playing a "tune-up" against the Montgomery Biscuits.

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So, I been thinking about this whole, Super/Mega Conference expansion, and since I am in Big 10 country... I was thinking about 5 key school that would help the the Big 10 as much as possible. Here is what I came up with:

ExpandedMapcopy.png?t=1276295489

Ignore the 12... I'm not sure why it's on there.

Probably because you stole someone else's idea, and tried to pass it off as your own.....

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So, I been thinking about this whole, Super/Mega Conference expansion, and since I am in Big 10 country... I was thinking about 5 key school that would help the the Big 10 as much as possible. Here is what I came up with:

ExpandedMapcopy.png?t=1276295489

Ignore the 12... I'm not sure why it's on there.

Probably because you stole someone else's idea, and tried to pass it off as your own.....

Honestly... Someone is said there was an article about it last year in SI... I didn't read it. Never really liked SI. The Names of the divisions just came from nicknames of the regions. I guess someone from SI had done something similar.

I would like to read the article, however. I've been googling the topic, but can't find the article. What I did find was an article from Fanhouse. http://ncaafootball.fanhouse.com/2010/06/08/big-ten-notre-dame-are-talking-again/

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I think the super conferences do take us toward a step to a college football playoff because it takes us closer to the big schools just pulling out of the NCAA and starting their own governing body. At that point there would be no reason to keep the bowls instead of a playoff because a playoff in this new association the money doesn't have to be split with all the small lower division schools. A playoff would create more money than the bowls.

Now after saying that for the same reason it also takes us towards a really crappy NCAA basketball tournament as there won't be as Cinderella would be dead.

I'm hoping that somehow this super-conference alliance could somehow become football-only and allow for the creation (or revival) of smaller, more closely-knit (geographically) conferences for basketball and other sports. I've felt for awhile now that each individual sport should have its own governing body so that schools like Louisiana Tech don't have to break themselves by sending their volleyball and soccer teams to the mountain states just because the football team didn't have anywhere else to go.

Also, if the super-conferences end up breaking away, I see the NCAA getting rid of the FBS/FCS designation, thereby (ironically) deciding the Division 1 championship with the already existing FCS playoff.

The bowls might also still be around since technically, they're exhibitions that are played after the season and aren't sanctioned by the NCAA anyway. Somehow, I don't see the teams that missed the playoffs giving up an easy paycheck.

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I am reading now that Texas and Texas A&M are petitioning to join the Big 10... which is something I don't think anyone called. Is it true? Probably not. But anyway:

High level sources in multiple conferences have told KCTV5 that Texas and Texas A&M are looking to move to the Big Ten Conference and are in talks to join the conference, while the University of Oklahoma is planning on petitioning the Southeastern Conference to become a member of its conference.

http://kentsterling.com/2010/06/10/big-ten-expansion-texas-and-texas-am-may-choose-big-ten/

http://www.kctv5.com/sports/23860558/detail.html

If this is true... now I start to get worried. Can anyone say "Game Changer"?

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