TheFloridianLogoMan

2014 MLB Changes (logo, uniform wise, etc)

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We were taught cursive in second or third grade, but but fourth grade, most kids just stopped using it. My mom always complains how they don't teach vocabulary or cursive anymore. I agree. I was always bad at printing and cursive, and many of my friends had terrible as well. We were more-or-less taught enough to get by, but there were no expectations for us to write well. I think it's easier to read bad handwriting than bad cursive, so maybe that's part of the reason why schools don't teach cursive as much anymore.

I personally gave up cursive around 4th grade and didn't get back into it until college. I've since improved my handwriting. It's much quicker for taking notes. Although everything is on computers now, most people still take notes on paper during class, not on laptops. I took a laptop to class a few times, and I was the only jackass tapping away and disrupting the whole room. Maybe with things transferring to tablets now, people will be able to type in a quieter manner and nobody will bring notebooks to class anymore. Either way, I think cursive is a valuable skill.

And to the original point, I never saw the issue with the "I" in Indians. It was terrible as a standalone logo, but it works fine as part of the script.

I don't know where or when you went to school, but for me (graduated Rutgers in '12) the vast majority of students brought laptops...paper notebooks were a rare sight.

Perhaps it's a matter of field. In my Architecture class, no one had a laptop. Then again, right now I can't say that more than 15 percent of the people I know own a laptop at all, let alone plan to carry it around for note-taking.

It must be, because I didn't know a single person who didn't have a laptop in college.

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Any jersey that had the small circle "Pending League/Club Approval" logo were not finalized. The Dodgers had that, so the pic is probably the finalized version.

The non-finalized were: CHW, CLE, DET, HOU, KC, LAD, NYY, TOR, & WAS.

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A criticism of the whole Indians script that I've read here a few times is that it's an uncanny-valley facsimile of cursive, one that's too perfectly rendered to have been drawn by hand. Same's been said for the Phillies.

The thing with their scripts is that they're too "bubbly." Both teams' old scripts were natural feeling.

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It's the "uncanny valley" thing again. The handwritten scripts had character that shone through, while the computer-created versions are so perfect they're soulless.

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I don't care if it looks handwritten or if a machine did it, just give me a wordmark that looks good.

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I think most of the country is moving away from teaching cursive, i'd be shocked if any kid currently in grade school can read a sentence of it. Cursive was doomed once the internet and word processing became a part of our everyday lives. At least it still lives on baseball jerseys as a relic of the past....for now. (For the record, i like the Indians script as well as the "I")

This is total news to me. It's still taught in the Philadelphia area. I volunteer with inner-city high school kids and the other night I was actually pleasantly surprised that they knew how to write it.

I graduated high school in '08, and although we learned it in 3rd grade, almost no one wrote in it. I remember on the SAT we had to write the honor statement on the back in cursive, I was sitting there making up letters. Took me like ten minutes to write.

Oh man, that was one of the hardest parts of the SAT for me hahaha. I felt like Billy Madison..."Rirruto?" "Those are Zs!"

I just remember having to learn it and use it in 2nd and maybe part of 3rd grade, and then it never showed up again until the SAT. Grew up in NJ, so not sure about Ohio.

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I don't care if it looks handwritten or if a machine did it, just give me a wordmark that looks good.

I don't care, either, except in as far as the fact that many scripts designed on a computer show it clearly, to their detriment.

Sometimes the process is important, not for its own sake but for how it shapes the finished product.

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We were taught cursive in second or third grade, but but fourth grade, most kids just stopped using it. My mom always complains how they don't teach vocabulary or cursive anymore. I agree. I was always bad at printing and cursive, and many of my friends had terrible as well. We were more-or-less taught enough to get by, but there were no expectations for us to write well. I think it's easier to read bad handwriting than bad cursive, so maybe that's part of the reason why schools don't teach cursive as much anymore.

I personally gave up cursive around 4th grade and didn't get back into it until college. I've since improved my handwriting. It's much quicker for taking notes. Although everything is on computers now, most people still take notes on paper during class, not on laptops. I took a laptop to class a few times, and I was the only jackass tapping away and disrupting the whole room. Maybe with things transferring to tablets now, people will be able to type in a quieter manner and nobody will bring notebooks to class anymore. Either way, I think cursive is a valuable skill.

And to the original point, I never saw the issue with the "I" in Indians. It was terrible as a standalone logo, but it works fine as part of the script.

I don't know where or when you went to school, but for me (graduated Rutgers in '12) the vast majority of students brought laptops...paper notebooks were a rare sight.

I went to Illinois, and graduated a decade ago. I was basing it off my the MBA classes which I finished two years ago. Admittedly, people might have gone away from laptops (like me) because the classes were smaller and it's more disruptive than typing in a filled lecture hall.

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We were taught cursive in second or third grade, but but fourth grade, most kids just stopped using it. My mom always complains how they don't teach vocabulary or cursive anymore. I agree. I was always bad at printing and cursive, and many of my friends had terrible as well. We were more-or-less taught enough to get by, but there were no expectations for us to write well. I think it's easier to read bad handwriting than bad cursive, so maybe that's part of the reason why schools don't teach cursive as much anymore.

I personally gave up cursive around 4th grade and didn't get back into it until college. I've since improved my handwriting. It's much quicker for taking notes. Although everything is on computers now, most people still take notes on paper during class, not on laptops. I took a laptop to class a few times, and I was the only jackass tapping away and disrupting the whole room. Maybe with things transferring to tablets now, people will be able to type in a quieter manner and nobody will bring notebooks to class anymore. Either way, I think cursive is a valuable skill.

And to the original point, I never saw the issue with the "I" in Indians. It was terrible as a standalone logo, but it works fine as part of the script.

I don't know where or when you went to school, but for me (graduated Rutgers in '12) the vast majority of students brought laptops...paper notebooks were a rare sight.

I went to Illinois, and graduated a decade ago. I was basing it off my the MBA classes which I finished two years ago. Admittedly, people might have gone away from laptops (like me) because the classes were smaller and it's more disruptive than typing in a filled lecture hall.

Wifi was also much less prevalent in 2004.

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I don't care if it looks handwritten or if a machine did it, just give me a wordmark that looks good.

I don't care, either, except in as far as the fact that many scripts designed on a computer show it clearly, to their detriment.

Sometimes the process is important, not for its own sake but for how it shapes the finished product.

Its impossible to tell how the Indians script (or any other current script that are perceived to be computer drawn) was drawn unless you saw it along every step of the way. They could have been perfected by hand and then brought on the computer. Or maybe they did a quick sketch and did most of the perfecting in illustrator. Or perhaps they did start on the computer from the beginning but its not possible to know unless we're talking about hand cut lettering from the era before computers.

I've worked with enough designers to know that you can get fantastic results from drawing everything out on paper. You can also get fantastic results from starting from scratch on the computer. You can also get :censored: results from either process as well. The skills and talent of the designer working on it is so much more important than the process.

Don't' get me wrong, the process is very important. It's important to find what process works for each designer on each product.

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We were taught cursive in second or third grade, but but fourth grade, most kids just stopped using it. My mom always complains how they don't teach vocabulary or cursive anymore. I agree. I was always bad at printing and cursive, and many of my friends had terrible as well. We were more-or-less taught enough to get by, but there were no expectations for us to write well. I think it's easier to read bad handwriting than bad cursive, so maybe that's part of the reason why schools don't teach cursive as much anymore.

I personally gave up cursive around 4th grade and didn't get back into it until college. I've since improved my handwriting. It's much quicker for taking notes. Although everything is on computers now, most people still take notes on paper during class, not on laptops. I took a laptop to class a few times, and I was the only jackass tapping away and disrupting the whole room. Maybe with things transferring to tablets now, people will be able to type in a quieter manner and nobody will bring notebooks to class anymore. Either way, I think cursive is a valuable skill.

And to the original point, I never saw the issue with the "I" in Indians. It was terrible as a standalone logo, but it works fine as part of the script.

I don't know where or when you went to school, but for me (graduated Rutgers in '12) the vast majority of students brought laptops...paper notebooks were a rare sight.

I went to Illinois, and graduated a decade ago. I was basing it off my the MBA classes which I finished two years ago. Admittedly, people might have gone away from laptops (like me) because the classes were smaller and it's more disruptive than typing in a filled lecture hall.

Funny. I got a masters in comp sci from Villanova and used pencil and notebooks for everything unless there was a lab or something that required me to be at a PC. I didn't own a laptop. Admittedly most students (most were younger than me) did have laptops with them at all times so I was probably the minority. Funny that business students were more high tech than at least one compsci guy. FWIW this was 2008.

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I went to Illinois, and graduated a decade ago. I was basing it off my the MBA classes which I finished two years ago. Admittedly, people might have gone away from laptops (like me) because the classes were smaller and it's more disruptive than typing in a filled lecture hall.

Wifi was also much less prevalent in 2004.

Right, but I was basing my claims about laptops off of the MBA classes I completed 2 years ago. Like I said, it's just anecdotal, but the one day I brought a laptop into a classroom of about 25 people, I was getting dirty looks for my typing distrupting people. Maybe it was just the room, because the keystrokes were loud and echoing.

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That cap is just so stupid on so many levels. The reason the A's road cap works over the home cap is because the cap is all green with the gold A. The home cap would look ok on the road, but the white A with the grey jerseys always looks just a bit off. Even as an alt cap it doesn't work because it's a reverse of the Alt jersey. That's going to look downright AWFUL.

Uggh, this looks so pathetically bush league. What the F*** are you thinking, A's?

$_57.JPG

null_zps4b1bc89e.jpg

That jersey is goneso after 2013, new green alt for the A's is on the way

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It's the "uncanny valley" thing again. The handwritten scripts had character that shone through, while the computer-created versions are so perfect they're soulless.

I've been trying for a goodly while to describe how I feel about the Brewers' current set. This is it. I don't think it's an ugly set, nor do I think it's inappropriate for the team. It's just "too perfect," especially compared to their other sets. Just my opinion.

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That cap is just so stupid on so many levels. The reason the A's road cap works over the home cap is because the cap is all green with the gold A. The home cap would look ok on the road, but the white A with the grey jerseys always looks just a bit off. Even as an alt cap it doesn't work because it's a reverse of the Alt jersey. That's going to look downright AWFUL.

Uggh, this looks so pathetically bush league. What the F*** are you thinking, A's?

$_57.JPG

null_zps4b1bc89e.jpg

That jersey is goneso after 2013, new green alt for the A's is on the way

hmm so will they reverse the colors or will they mimic the gold jersey format.

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Well, I graduated H.S. in 1980 and got my bachelor's degree in 1985, so of course we took notes by using burnt sticks on parchment paper. While reading sea scrolls by candlelight.

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That cap is just so stupid on so many levels. The reason the A's road cap works over the home cap is because the cap is all green with the gold A. The home cap would look ok on the road, but the white A with the grey jerseys always looks just a bit off. Even as an alt cap it doesn't work because it's a reverse of the Alt jersey. That's going to look downright AWFUL.

Uggh, this looks so pathetically bush league. What the F*** are you thinking, A's?

$_57.JPG

null_zps4b1bc89e.jpg

That jersey is goneso after 2013, new green alt for the A's is on the way

hmm so will they reverse the colors or will they mimic the gold jersey format.

Any clues for us Chris?

Well, I graduated H.S. in 1980 and got my bachelor's degree in 1985, so of course we took notes by using burnt sticks on parchment paper. While reading sea scrolls by candlelight.

Harry Potter?

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That cap is just so stupid on so many levels. The reason the A's road cap works over the home cap is because the cap is all green with the gold A. The home cap would look ok on the road, but the white A with the grey jerseys always looks just a bit off. Even as an alt cap it doesn't work because it's a reverse of the Alt jersey. That's going to look downright AWFUL.

Uggh, this looks so pathetically bush league. What the F*** are you thinking, A's?

$_57.JPG

null_zps4b1bc89e.jpg

That jersey is goneso after 2013, new green alt for the A's is on the way

UGGGGGGHHH!!! Really, A's? That's one of the best jerseys in the entire league! Why do teams that have such solid looks absolutely insist on trying to fix what isn't broken?

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